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Leveraging administrative data to better understand and address child maltreatment: a scoping review of data linkage studies

Soneson, E; Das, S; Burn, A-M; van Melle, M; Anderson, JK; Fazel, M; Fonagy, P; ... Moore, A; + view all (2023) Leveraging administrative data to better understand and address child maltreatment: a scoping review of data linkage studies. Child Maltreatment (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Background. This scoping review aimed to overview studies that used administrative data linkage in the context of child maltreatment to improve our understanding of the value that data linkage may confer for policy, practice, and research. / Methods. We searched five databases in June 2019 and May 2020 for studies that linked two or more datasets (at least one of which was administrative) to study child maltreatment. / Results. We included 121 studies, primarily from the United States or Australia and published in the past decade. Data came primarily from social services and health sectors, and linkage processes and data quality were often not described in sufficient detail to align with current reporting guidelines. Most studies were descriptive in nature and research questions addressed fell under eight themes: descriptive epidemiology, risk factors, outcomes, intergenerational transmission, predictive modelling, intervention/service evaluation, multi-sector involvement, and methodological considerations/advancements. / Conclusions. Included studies demonstrated the wide variety of ways in which data linkage can contribute to the public health response to child maltreatment. However, how research using linked data can be translated into effective service development and monitoring, or targeting of interventions, is underexplored in terms of privacy protection, ethics and governance, data quality, and evidence of effectiveness.

Type: Article
Title: Leveraging administrative data to better understand and address child maltreatment: a scoping review of data linkage studies
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/CMX
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Child maltreatment, Child abuse, Neglect, Data analytics, Policy, Public health
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10142509
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