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Analysis of fouling and breakthrough of process related impurities during depth filtration using confocal microscopy

Parau, M; Johnson, TF; Pullen, J; Bracewell, DG; (2022) Analysis of fouling and breakthrough of process related impurities during depth filtration using confocal microscopy. Biotechnology Progress , 38 (2) , Article e3233. 10.1002/btpr.3233. Green open access

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Abstract

Titer improvement has driven process intensification in mAb manufacture. However, this has come with the drawback of high cell densities and associated process related impurities such as cell debris, host cell protein (HCP), and DNA. This affects the capacity of depth filters and can lead to carryover of impurities to protein A chromatography leading to early resin fouling. New depth filter materials provide the opportunity to remove more process related impurities at this early stage in the process. Hence, there is a need to understand the mechanism of impurity removal within these filters. In this work, the secondary depth filter Millistak+ X0HC (cellulose and diatomaceous earth) is compared with the X0SP (synthetic), by examining the breakthrough of DNA and HCP. Additionally, a novel method was developed to image the location of key impurities within the depth filter structure under a confocal microscope. Flux, tested at 75, 100, and 250 LMH was found to affect the maximal throughput based on the max pressure of 30 psi, but no significant changes were seen in the HCP and DNA breakthrough. However, a drop in cell culture viability, from 87% to 37%, lead to the DNA breakthrough at 10% decreasing from 81 to 55 L/m2 for X0HC and from 105 to 47 L/m2 for X0SP. The HCP breakthrough was not affected by cell culture viability or filter type. The X0SP filter has a 30%–50% higher max throughput depending on viability, which can be explained by the confocal imaging where the debris and DNA are distributed differently in the layers of the filter pods, with more of the second tighter layer being utilized in the X0SP.

Type: Article
Title: Analysis of fouling and breakthrough of process related impurities during depth filtration using confocal microscopy
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/btpr.3233
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/btpr.3233
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2022 The Authors. Biotechnology Progress published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: bioprocessing, CHO cell culture, depth filter, downstream processing, harvest
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Biochemical Engineering
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10142412
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