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Functional brain plasticity following childhood maltreatment: A longitudinal fMRI investigation of autobiographical memory processing

Puetz, VB; Viding, E; Maguire, EA; Mechelli, A; Armbruster-Genc, D; Sharp, M; Rankin, G; ... McCrory, EJ; + view all (2021) Functional brain plasticity following childhood maltreatment: A longitudinal fMRI investigation of autobiographical memory processing. Development and Psychopathology 10.1017/S0954579421001292. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Altered autobiographical memory (ABM) processing characterizes some individuals with experiences of childhood maltreatment. This fMRI study of ABM processing evaluated potential developmental plasticity in neural functioning following maltreatment. Adolescents with (N = 19; MT group) and without (N = 18; Non-MT group) documented childhood maltreatment recalled specific ABMs in response to emotionally valenced cue words during fMRI at baseline (age 12.71 ± 1.48) and follow-up (14.88 ± 1.53 years). Psychological assessments were collected at both timepoints. Longitudinal analyses were carried out with BOLD signal changes during ABM recall and psychopathology to investigate change over time. In both groups there was relative stability of the ABM brain network, with some developmental maturational changes observed in cortical midline structures (ventromedial PFC (vmPFC), posterior cingulate cortex (pCC), and retrosplenial cortex (rSC). Significantly increased activation of the right rSC was observed only in the MT group, which was associated with improved psychological functioning. Baseline group differences in relation to hippocampal functioning, were not detected at follow-up. This study provides preliminary empirical evidence of functional developmental plasticity in children with documented maltreatment experience using fMRI. This suggests that altered patterns of brain function, associated with maltreatment experience, are not fixed and may reflect the potential to track a neural basis of resilience.

Type: Article
Title: Functional brain plasticity following childhood maltreatment: A longitudinal fMRI investigation of autobiographical memory processing
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S0954579421001292
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954579421001292
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Social Sciences, Psychology, Developmental, Psychology, autobiographical memory, brain plasticity, childhood maltreatment, fMRI, longitudinal study, LATENT VULNERABILITY, NEURAL RESPONSE, OVERGENERAL MEMORY, CHILDREN, DEPRESSION, CONNECTIVITY, ADOLESCENTS, REJECTION, CONTEXT, RISK
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10142342
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