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Geological and soil engineering properties of shallow landslides occurring in the Kutupalong Rohingya Camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh

Kamal, ASMM; Hossain, F; Rahman, MZ; Ahmed, B; Sammonds, P; (2022) Geological and soil engineering properties of shallow landslides occurring in the Kutupalong Rohingya Camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Landslides 10.1007/s10346-021-01810-6. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

The Forcibly Displaced Myanmar Nationals (FDMN), historically known as ‘Rohingya’ who fled the 2017 ethnic atrocities and genocide in the Northern Rakhine State of Myanmar, took shelter in Cox’s Bazar District of Bangladesh. The camp network, known as Kutupalong Rohingya Camp (KRC), is situated in the tectonically active tertiary hilly terrain. The KRC has been experiencing hydrometeorological hazards, where landslides are frequent. This study investigated the slopes’ geological condition, engineering properties and human interventions, which influence the landslides. The exposed slopes were relatively high (> 10 m) and steep ranging from 40° to 60° that have numerous polygonal tension cracks and fissures. From the geological and geotechnical aspects, there are three successive units of slope materials: (1) residual soils of sandy silt with clay, (2) highly weathered silty sandstones and (3) shale/clay with silt and fine sand intercalations at the bottom of the slopes. Field observations revealed that most slope failures occurred in the residual soil and weathered silty sandstone units. The residual soils have a bulk density of 1.49–1.97 g/cm3, a liquid limit of 25–48%, a plasticity index of 5–16% and an undrained shear strength of 23–46 kPa. The silty sandstones have a bulk density of 1.44–1.94 g/cm3, an internal friction angle of 34°–40° and a cohesion of 0.5–13 kPa. The mineralogical composition determined by the X-ray diffraction shows low clay mineral content, which does not affect landslides. However, the slope geometry, low shear strength with strain softening properties and torrential rainfall accompanied by anthropogenic factors cause numerous landslides every year. This study will help take proper mitigation and preparedness measures for slope protection in the KRC area and surroundings.

Type: Article
Title: Geological and soil engineering properties of shallow landslides occurring in the Kutupalong Rohingya Camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s10346-021-01810-6
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10346-021-01810-6
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made.
Keywords: Rohingya; Landslides; Geology; Soil engineering; Anthropogenic factors; Cox’s Bazar
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences > Dept of Earth Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences > Inst for Risk and Disaster Reduction
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10141834
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