UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

What Drives the Perceived Legitimacy of Collaborative Governance? An Experimental Study

Lee, S; Esteve, M; (2022) What Drives the Perceived Legitimacy of Collaborative Governance? An Experimental Study. Public Management Review 10.1080/14719037.2022.2026692. (In press).

[thumbnail of CG Legitimacy_PMR FINAL REVISION with author details.pdf] Text
CG Legitimacy_PMR FINAL REVISION with author details.pdf - Accepted Version
Access restricted to UCL open access staff until 10 July 2022.

Download (2MB)

Abstract

While the legitimacy of a governing entity has long been studied in traditional government contexts, few studies have examined the legitimacy of contemporary governing arrangements like collaborative governance. This study explores the perceived legitimacy of collaborative governance from a citizens’ perspective. We use a preregistered online survey experiment to test the effect of three factors—representation, performance information, and issue complexity—on the perceived legitimacy of a collaboration. Findings from 1,470 U.S. respondents provide empirical evidenceshow that representation and positive performance information influence citizens’ perceptions of collaborative governance legitimacy, while issue complexity has little impact. Additionally, heterogeneous treatment effects were found: respondents with low trust in public organizations factor representation more into their legitimacy perceptions of collaborative governance, while those with high trust in public organizations show little influence of representation. This study concludes with theoretical and practical implications of the findings and provides suggestions for future research on legitimacy in networked governance settings.

Type: Article
Title: What Drives the Perceived Legitimacy of Collaborative Governance? An Experimental Study
DOI: 10.1080/14719037.2022.2026692
Publisher version: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rpxm20/current
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Dept of Political Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10141575
Downloads since deposit
1Download
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item