UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Coronavirus infections from 2002-2021: Neuropsychiatric Manifestations

Barthorpe, A; Rogers, JP; (2021) Coronavirus infections from 2002-2021: Neuropsychiatric Manifestations. Sleep Medicine 10.1016/j.sleep.2021.11.013. (In press).

[thumbnail of 1-s2.0-S1389945721005797-main.pdf] Text
1-s2.0-S1389945721005797-main.pdf - Accepted Version
Access restricted to UCL open access staff until 9 December 2022.

Download (856kB)

Abstract

Coronaviruses have been known to infect humans for several decades and there are four endemic subtypes: HCoV (human coronavirus) -229E, -NL63, -OC43 and -HKU1. These mainly cause a mild upper respiratory illness, but occasionally in vulnerable individuals they can result in more severe respiratory disease and, rarely, CNS involvement. Prior exposure to these viruses has also been associated with an increased odds of having a major psychiatric illness. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), caused by SARS-CoV, started in 2002 and, as well as causing a more severe respiratory phenotype, was also associated with delirium and affective symptoms acutely. Psychosis occurred in about 1% of individuals and was generally thought to be due to corticosteroid administration. The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), caused by MERS-CoV, revealed similar findings. Survivors of both SARS and MERS reported persistent physical and psychological symptoms at least several months after the acute illness. The reported neuropsychiatric symptoms of COVID-19 range from the common symptoms of systemic and upper respiratory infections to severe and disabling conditions. Delirium has been described using varying terminology; as well as being a possible presenting feature of COVID-19, it has also been shown to be a marker of severe disease. Stroke, both ischaemic and haemorrhagic, have been reported to be more common in COVID-19 than in other medical illnesses. Mood and anxiety disorders are likely to be common at follow-up, while psychosis remains rare and controversial. ‘Long Covid’ is likely to represent a highly clinically and aetiologically heterogeneous group.

Type: Article
Title: Coronavirus infections from 2002-2021: Neuropsychiatric Manifestations
DOI: 10.1016/j.sleep.2021.11.013
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2021.11.013
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions.
Keywords: COVID-19coronavirus; neuropsychiatry; depression; delirium; psychosis
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10140915
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item