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Development of a swallowing risk screening tool and best practice recommendations for the management of oropharyngeal dysphagia following acute cervical spinal cord injury: an international multi-professional Delphi consensus

McRae, J; Smith, C; Beeke, S; Emmanuel, A; (2021) Development of a swallowing risk screening tool and best practice recommendations for the management of oropharyngeal dysphagia following acute cervical spinal cord injury: an international multi-professional Delphi consensus. Disability and Rehabilitation 10.1080/09638288.2021.2012607. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Purpose: International multi-professional expert consensus was sought to develop best practice recommendations for clinical management of patients following cervical spinal cord injury with oropharyngeal dysphagia and associated complications. Additionally, risk factors for dysphagia were identified to support the development of a screening tool. // Materials and Methods: A two-round Delphi study was undertaken with a 27-member panel of expert professionals in cervical spinal cord injury and complex dysphagia. They rated 85 statements across seven topic areas in round one, using a five-point Likert scale with a consensus set at 70%. Statements not achieving consensus were revised for the second round. Comparative group and individual feedback were provided at the end of each round. // Results: Consensus was achieved for 50 (59%) statements in round one and a further 12 (48%) statements in round two. Recommendations for best practice were agreed for management of swallowing, respiratory function, communication, nutrition and oral care. Twelve risk factors for dysphagia were identified for components of a screening tool. // Conclusions: Best practice recommendations support wider clinical management to prevent complications and direct specialist care. Screening for risk factors allows early dysphagia identification with the potential to improve clinical outcomes. Further evaluation of the impact of these recommendations is needed.

Type: Article
Title: Development of a swallowing risk screening tool and best practice recommendations for the management of oropharyngeal dysphagia following acute cervical spinal cord injury: an international multi-professional Delphi consensus
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/09638288.2021.2012607
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2021.2012607
Language: English
Additional information: © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Keywords: Deglutition disorders; spinal cord injuries; rehabilitation; tracheostomy; ventilator weaning; communication disorders
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inst for Liver and Digestive Hlth
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10140873
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