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Analyzing Radicalization and Terrorism: A Situational Action Theory

Wikström, POH; Bouhana, N; (2017) Analyzing Radicalization and Terrorism: A Situational Action Theory. In: The Handbook of the Criminology of Terrorism. (pp. 175-186). Wiley: Chichester, UK. Green open access

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Abstract

Although the years since 9/11 have seen an significant increase in the contribution of criminologists to the study of terrorist events, efforts to apply major criminological theories to the understanding of the development of terrorist criminality and individual involvement in terrorist action have lagged. In this chapter, we apply a recently formulated theory of moral action and crime causation, Situational Action Theory, to the explanation of terrorism and radicalization. The case is made that explanations of terrorism and radicalisation should be mechanism-based and integrate all levels of analysis. Situational Action Theory is introduced and examples of its application to the study of terrorism and radicalization are provided. The priorities of a SAT-driven, systematic research agenda are outlined.

Type: Book chapter
Title: Analyzing Radicalization and Terrorism: A Situational Action Theory
ISBN-13: 9781118923955
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/9781118923986.ch11
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118923986.ch11
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Security and Crime Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10140814
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