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A comparative cohort study of Duhamel and Endorectal Pullthrough for Hirschsprung's Disease

Davidson, J; Mutanen, A; Salli, M; Kyrklund, K; De Coppi, P; Curry, J; Eaton, S; (2022) A comparative cohort study of Duhamel and Endorectal Pullthrough for Hirschsprung's Disease. BJS Open , 6 (1) , Article zrab143. 10.1093/bjsopen/zrab143. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: There are limited data available to compare outcomes between surgical approaches for Hirschsprung’s disease. Duhamel and endorectal pull-through (ERPT) are two of the most common procedures performed worldwide. // Methods: Objective outcomes were compared between contemporary cohorts (aged 4–32 years) after Duhamel or ERPT using case–control methodology. Data were collected using prospectively administered standardized questionnaires on bowel and bladder function and quality of life (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, Short form 36 and Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index). Patients were compared in two age groups (18 years and younger and older than 18 years) and reference made to normative control data. Multivariable analysis explored factors associated with poor outcomes. // Results: Cohorts were well matched by demographics, disease characteristics and incidence of postoperative complications (120 patients who underwent Duhamel versus 57 patients who had ERPT). Bowel function scores were similar between groups. Patients who underwent Duhamel demonstrated worse constipation and inferior faecal awareness scores (P < 0.01 for both age groups). Recurrent postoperative enterocolitis was significantly more common after ERPT (34 versus 6 per cent; odds ratio 15.56 (95 per cent c.i. 6.19 to 39.24; P < 0.0001)). On multivariable analysis, poor bowel outcome was the only factor significantly associated with poor urinary outcome (adjusted odds ratio 6.66 (95 per cent c.i. 1.74 to 25.50; P = 0.006)) and was significantly associated with markedly reduced quality of life (QoL) in all instruments used (P < 0.001 for all). There were no associations between QoL measures and pull-through technique. // Conclusion: Outcomes from Duhamel and ERPT are good in the majority of cases, with comparable bowel function scores. Constipation and impaired faecal awareness were more prevalent after Duhamel, with differences sustained in adulthood. Recurrent enterocolitis was significantly more prevalent after ERPT. Clustering of poor QoL and poor functional outcomes were observed in both cohorts, with seemingly little effect by choice of surgical procedure in terms of QoL.

Type: Article
Title: A comparative cohort study of Duhamel and Endorectal Pullthrough for Hirschsprung's Disease
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/bjsopen/zrab143
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsopen/zrab143
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2022. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of BJS Society Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health > Maternal and Fetal Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Biology and Cancer Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10140775
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