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Inflammatory status, body composition and ethnic differences in bone mineral density: The Southall and Brent Revisited Study

Durdin, R; Parsons, C; Dennison, EM; Williams, S; Tillin, T; Chaturvedi, N; Cooper, C; ... Ward, KA; + view all (2021) Inflammatory status, body composition and ethnic differences in bone mineral density: The Southall and Brent Revisited Study. Bone , 155 , Article 116286. 10.1016/j.bone.2021.116286. Green open access

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Abstract

Ethnic differences in bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk are well-described; the aim of this study was to investigate whether central adiposity or inflammatory status contribute to these ethnic differences in BMD in later life. The Southall and Brent Revisited study (SABRE) is a UK-based tri-ethnic cohort of men and women of European, South Asian or African Caribbean origin. At the most recent SABRE follow-up (2014-2018), in addition to measures of cardiometabolic phenotype, participants had dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) bone and body composition scans. Multiple linear regression was used to determine whether markers of body composition, central adiposity or inflammatory status contributed to ethnic differences in BMD. In men and women, age- and height-adjusted BMD at all sites was higher in African Caribbeans compared to Europeans (femoral neck: standardised β (95% confidence interval): men: 1.00SD (0.75, 1.25); women: 0.77SD (0.56, 0.99)). South Asian men had higher BMD than European men at the hip (femoral neck: 0.34SD (95%CI: 0.15, 0.54)). Although adjustment for body mass index (BMI) or lean mass index (LMI) at the lumbar spine reduced the size of the difference in BMD between African Caribbean and European men (age and height adjusted difference: 0.35SD (0.08, 0.62); age and BMI adjusted difference: 0.25SD (-0.02, 0.51)), in both men and women ethnic differences remained after adjustment for measures of central adiposity (estimated visceral adipose tissue mass (VAT mass) and android to gynoid ratio) and inflammation (interleukin-6 (logIL-6) and C-reactive protein (logCRP)). Furthermore, in women, we observed ethnic differences in the relationship between BMI (overall interaction: p = 0.04), LMI (p = 0.04) or VAT mass (p = 0.009) and standardised lumbar spine BMD. In this tri-ethnic cohort, ethnic differences in BMD at the femoral neck, total hip or lumbar spine were not explained by BMI, central adiposity or inflammatory status. Given ethnic differences in fracture incidence, it is important to further investigate why ethnic differences in BMD exist.

Type: Article
Title: Inflammatory status, body composition and ethnic differences in bone mineral density: The Southall and Brent Revisited Study
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.bone.2021.116286
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2021.116286
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third-party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Body composition, Bone mineral density, Epidemiology, Ethnicity, Inflammation, Osteoporosis
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10140521
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