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The uses of post-editing in the subtitling classroom: What do subtitlers-to-be say?

Bolaños García-Escribano, A; (2021) The uses of post-editing in the subtitling classroom: What do subtitlers-to-be say? Presented at: APTIS 2021: Evolving Profiles: The Future of Translation and Interpreting Training, Dublin, Ireland. Green open access

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Abstract

In recent years, an increasing number of scholars have attempted to gain a better understanding of the technological advancements and innovation that are gaining momentum in the audiovisual translation (AVT) industry (Díaz-Cintas and Massidda, 2019). We live surrounded by screens and have become avid consumers of audiovisual content (Nikolic and Bywood, 2021), particularly led by streaming platforms and the internetisation of society (Lobato, 2018). Technology has also altered industry workflows and translators’ workstations and habits. A wider integration of cloud technologies in AVT localisation has taken place (Bolaños-García-Escribano and Díaz-Cintas, 2020), and computer-assisted technologies, such as machine translation and translation memory, which were often neglected in our field, have also gained greater currency (Burchardt et al., 2016). Machine translation engines are operating in cloud-based subtitling systems (Mehta et al., 2020), which are offering features that allow for machine-translated subtitles from pre-spotted templates and integrate automatic speech recognition to further automatise the spotting of subtitles. As discussed by Georgakopoulou and Bywood (2014) and Bywood et al. (2017), this has led to a rise in the profile of the post-editor in AVT, and more specifically subtitling. I will discuss two educational experiences in which subtitlers-to-be were required to post-edit subtitled audiovisual material in both English and Spanish. In the first experience, an international team of eight translation trainees post-edited raw automatic subtitles for educational videos following a project-based approach. The second experience (2021) was a practical experiment involving master-level students of subtitling who localised a video clip using a commercial cloud-based subtitling system; it involved a control group and another two groups that did not use machine translation. The feedback collated after each experience through online questionnaires has proved paramount to further justify the need to embed subtitle post-editing in the AVT curriculum. The purpose of this study is to ultimately identify bottlenecks as well as good practices in pedagogical subtitle post-editing.

Type: Conference item (Presentation)
Title: The uses of post-editing in the subtitling classroom: What do subtitlers-to-be say?
Event: APTIS 2021: Evolving Profiles: The Future of Translation and Interpreting Training
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Dates: 18 - 19 November 2021
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version: https://www.aptis-translation-interpreting.org/apt...
Language: English
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of Arts and Humanities
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of Arts and Humanities > SELCS
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10139664
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