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Psychodynamic Incidents in Teaching and Learning

Hogan, Ambrose Dominic; (2021) Psychodynamic Incidents in Teaching and Learning. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

This thesis argues for greater recognition of the rôle that psychodynamic and relational material plays in teaching, schools and classrooms, and introduces the idea of ‘psychodynamic incidents in teaching and learning’. Emerging out of years of classroom practice in secondary schools and in higher education, the research explores the boundary between teaching and psychotherapeutic clinical processes: to achieve this, the author draws on biographical material, his teaching experiences and experiential learning in psychoanalytic contexts, including the pre-clinical elements of a Jungian training in psychodynamic psychotherapy. The thesis makes use of co-authorship and autoethnography to provide a methodological framework within which a range of data (including autobiographical reflections on psychodynamic material and one piece of co- authored narrative) can be brought together as part of a coherent argument. The thesis presents data showing how clinical psychodynamic phenomena (resistance, defence against anxiety, conflict, object-relations, containment, attachment, transference/counter-transference, the therapeutic alliance, fantasy, and the impact of the unconscious itself) function as profound and significant forces in teaching which – though often denied or disavowed by practitioners – need to be recognised.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: Psychodynamic Incidents in Teaching and Learning
Event: UCL (University College London)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2021. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Culture, Communication and Media
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10139141
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