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Implementation of eHealth to support assessment and decision-making for residents with dementia in long-term care: systematic review

Gilliam, J; Davies, N; Aworinde, J; Yorganci, E; Anderson, J; Evans, C; (2021) Implementation of eHealth to support assessment and decision-making for residents with dementia in long-term care: systematic review. Journal of Medical Internet Research 10.2196/29837. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Background: As dementia progresses, symptoms and concerns increase causing considerable distress for the person and caregivers. Integration of care between care homes and healthcare services is vital to meet increasing care needs and maintain quality of life. However, access to high-quality healthcare is inequitable. eHealth offers a potential solution, by supporting remote specialist input on care processes like clinical assessment and decision-making, and streamlining care on site. How best to implement eHealth in the care home setting is unclear. Objective: This review aimed to identify key factors that influence implementation of eHealth for people living with dementia in long-term care. Methods: A systematic search of EMBASE, PsychInfo, MEDLINE and CINHAL was conducted to identify studies published between 2000-2020. Studies were eligible if they focused on eHealth interventions to improve treatment and care assessment or decision-making for residents with dementia in care homes. Data were thematically analysed and deductively mapped onto the six constructs of the adapted Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Results are presented as a narrative synthesis. Results: 29 studies were included, focusing on a variety of eHealth interventions including remote video-consultations and clinical decision support tools. Key factors which influenced eHealth implementation were identified across all six constructs of the CFIR. Most concerned the Inner Setting construct about requirements for implementation in the care home, such as providing a conducive learning climate, engaged leadership and sufficient training and resources. Four novel subconstructs were identified to inform implementation requirements to meet resident needs and engage end-users. Conclusions: Implementing eHealth in care homes for people with dementia is multi-factorial and complex, involving interaction between the resident, staff and organisation. Application of the CFIR for care homes requires an emphasis on the needs of residents and the engagement of end users in the implementation process. A novel conceptual model of the key factors was developed, and translated into 18 practical recommendations on implementation of eHealth in long-term care to guide implementers or innovators in care homes. The policy imperative for integrated health and social care demands successful implementation of eHealth, to maximise uptake and drive improvements.

Type: Article
Title: Implementation of eHealth to support assessment and decision-making for residents with dementia in long-term care: systematic review
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.2196/29837
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/29837
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Primary Care and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10139112
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