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B Cells in the CNS at Postmortem Are Associated With Worse Outcome and Cell Types in Multiple Sclerosis

Moccia, M; Haider, L; Eshaghi, A; van de Pavert, SHP; Brescia Morra, V; Patel, A; Wheeler-Kingshott, CAM; ... Ciccarelli, O; + view all (2022) B Cells in the CNS at Postmortem Are Associated With Worse Outcome and Cell Types in Multiple Sclerosis. Neurology - Neuroimmunology Neuroinflammation , 9 (1) , Article e1108. 10.1212/nxi.0000000000001108. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To define the clinical and pathologic correlations of compartmentalized perivascular B cells in postmortem progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) brains. METHODS: Brain slices were acquired from 11 people with secondary progressive (SP) MS, 5 people with primary progressive (PP) MS, and 4 controls. Brain slices were immunostained for B lymphocytes (CD20), T lymphocytes (CD3), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CD8), neuronal neurofilaments (NF200), myelin (SMI94), macrophages/microglia (CD68 and IBA1), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP]), and mitochondria (voltage-dependent anion channel and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4). Differences in CD20 immunostaining intensity between disease groups and associations between CD20 immunostaining intensity and both clinical variables and other immunostaining intensities were explored with linear mixed regression models and Cox regression models, as appropriate. RESULTS: CD20 immunostaining intensity was higher in PPMS (Coeff = 0.410; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.046, 0.774; p = 0.027) and SPMS (Coeff = 0.302; 95% CI = 0.020, 0.585; p = 0.036) compared with controls. CD20 immunostaining intensity was higher in cerebellar, spinal cord, and pyramidal onset (Coeff = 0.274; 95% CI = 0.039, 0.510; p = 0.022) compared with optic neuritis and sensory onset. Higher CD20 immunostaining intensity was associated with younger age at onset (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.033; 95% CI = 1.013, 1.053; p = 0.001), SP conversion (HR = 1.056; 95% CI = 1.022, 1.091; p = 0.001), wheelchair dependence (HR = 1.472; 95% CI = 1.108, 1.954; p = 0.008), and death (HR = 1.684; 95% CI = 1.238, 2.291; p = 0.001). Higher immunostaining intensity for CD20 was associated with higher immunostaining intensity for CD3 (Coeff = 0.114; 95% CI = 0.005, 0.224; p = 0.040), CD8 (Coeff = 0.275; 95% CI = 0.200, 0.350; p < 0.001), CD68 (Coeff = 0.084; 95% CI = 0.023, 0.144; p = 0.006), GFAP (Coeff = 0.002; 95% CI = 0.001, 0.004; p = 0.030), and damaged mitochondria (Coeff = 3.902; 95% CI = 0.891, 6.914; p = 0.011). DISCUSSION: Perivascular B cells were associated with worse clinical outcomes and CNS-compartmentalized inflammation. Our findings further support the concept of targeting compartmentalized B-cell inflammation in progressive MS.

Type: Article
Title: B Cells in the CNS at Postmortem Are Associated With Worse Outcome and Cell Types in Multiple Sclerosis
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1212/nxi.0000000000001108
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1212/NXI.0000000000001108
Language: English
Additional information: © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Brain Repair and Rehabilitation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neuroinflammation
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10138451
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