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Mediating Vulnerability: Comparative approaches and questions of genre

Masschelein, A and Mussgnug, F and Rushworth, J (Eds). (2021) Mediating Vulnerability: Comparative approaches and questions of genre. [Book]. Comparative Literature and Culture. UCL Press: London, UK. Green open access

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Abstract

Mediating Vulnerability examines vulnerability from a range of connected perspectives. It responds to the vulnerability of species, their extinction but also their transformation. This tension between extreme danger and creativity is played out in literary studies through the pressures the discipline brings to bear on its own categories, particularly those of genre. Extinction and preservation on the one hand, transformation, adaptation and (re)mediation on the other. These two poles inform our comparative and interdisciplinary project. The volume is situated within the particular intercultural and intermedial context of contemporary cultural representation. Vulnerability is explored as a site of potential destruction, human as well as animal, but also as a site of potential openness. This is the first book to bring vulnerability studies into dialogue with media and genre studies. It is organised in four sections: ‘Human/Animal’; Violence/Resistance’; ‘Image/Narrative’; and ‘Medium/Genre’. Each chapter considers the intersection of vulnerability and genre from a comparative perspective, bringing together a team of international contributors and editors. The book is in dialogue with the reflections of Judith Butler and others on vulnerability, and it questions categories of genre through an interdisciplinary engagement with different representational forms, including digital culture, graphic novels, video games, photography and TV series, in addition to novels and short stories. It offers new readings of high-profile contemporary authors of fiction including Margaret Atwood and Cormac McCarthy, as well as bringing lesser-known figures to the fore.

Type: Book
Title: Mediating Vulnerability: Comparative approaches and questions of genre
ISBN-13: 9781800081130
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.14324/111.9781800081130
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.14324/111.9781800081130
Language: English
Additional information: Collection © Editors, 2021 Text © Contributors, 2021 Any third- party material in this book is not covered by the book’s Creative Commons licence. Details of the copyright ownership and permitted use of third- party material is given in the image (or extract) credit lines. If you would like to reuse any third- party material not covered by the book’s Creative Commons licence, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright owner. This book is published under a Creative Commons Attribution- Non- Commercial 4.0 International licence (CC BY- NC 4.0), https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ . This licence allows you to share and adapt the work for non- commercial use providing attribution is made to the author and publisher (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work) and any changes are indicated. Attribution should include the following information: Masschelein, A., Mussgnug, F. and Rushworth, J. (eds). 2021. Mediating Vulnerabilty: Comparative approaches and questions of genre. London: UCL Press. https://doi.org/10.14324/ 111.9781800081130 Further details about Creative Commons licences are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/
Keywords: comparative literature, vulnerability, genre, media studies, literary studies
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of Arts and Humanities
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of Arts and Humanities > SELCS
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10138227
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