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Using the Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW) to characterise parenting interventions to prevent intergenerational child abuse

Younas, F; Gutman, L; (2022) Using the Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW) to characterise parenting interventions to prevent intergenerational child abuse. International Journal of Child Maltreatment 10.1007/s42448-021-00103-8. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Research shows that parents with a history of child abuse are at risk of perpetuating the cycle of abuse; however, exploration of intervention content is still a neglected area. This qualitative study identifies intervention components and corresponding mechanisms of change of parenting interventions to prevent intergenerational child abuse. Interviews with ten heads of interventions from the UK and USA were coded using deductive framework analysis. The Behaviour Change Technique (BCT) Taxonomy and Behaviour Change Wheel were used to code intervention components including BCTs and intervention functions. Mechanisms of change were coded using the Theoretical Domains Framework. Twelve BCTs and eight intervention functions were identified including education, enablement and training delivered through BCTs of instruction on how to perform a behaviour, restructuring the environment and social support. Corresponding mechanisms of change include behaviour regulation, knowledge and social influences, among others. This study offers insight into targeting and tailoring services to improve outcomes for parents with a history of child abuse. Findings suggest that there are possible mechanisms through which vulnerable parents can be helped to break the cycle of abuse including promoting social support, regulating parents’ behaviour through trauma-informed approaches and enhancing knowledge, self-esteem and confidence in parenting.

Type: Article
Title: Using the Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW) to characterise parenting interventions to prevent intergenerational child abuse
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s42448-021-00103-8
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s42448-021-00103-8
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Behaviour Change Wheel, Intergenerational child abuse, Parenting interventions, Mechanisms of change, Intervention components, Behaviour change techniques
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10137618
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