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The BRAIN-Q, a tool for assessing self-reported sport-related concussions for epidemiological studies

James, L; Davies, M; Mian, S; Seghezzo, G; Williamson, E; Kemp, S; Arden, N; ... Gallo, V; + view all (2021) The BRAIN-Q, a tool for assessing self-reported sport-related concussions for epidemiological studies. Epidemiology and Health , 2021 , Article e2021086. 10.4178/epih.e2021086. Green open access

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Abstract

Objectives: The BRAIN-Q is a tool aimed at maximising the accuracy, and minimising measurement error, for retrospectively assessing concussions. This paper reports agreement of the BRAIN-Q tool when compared to extant questionnaire questions, and reproducibility when compared with its telephonic version (tBRAIN-Q). Method: The BRAIN-Q entails a 3-stage process: defining concussion, creating a visual timeline with life events, and establishing detailed characteristics for each reported concussion. It was designed to be administered in-person by trained personnel, and was used in the BRAIN Study. Its performance was compared with the MSK Study which previously collected a few questions in a broader self-administered questionnaire; and with the tBRAIN-Q Recall, its telephonic version. Results: 101 participants were included; of these, nine were re-assessed with the tBRAIN-Q. Compared to the BRAIN-Q, the agreement with the MSK-Q for rugby-related concussion was 86.7% (kappa 0.6). Rugby-related concussion with loss of consciousness showed lower agreement (82.0% (kappa 0.6)). The comparison between the BRAIN-Q and the tBRAIN-Q showed a good reproducibility. Conclusions: The BRAIN-Q is a relatively easy tool to administer in face-to-face assessments, it showed an optimal reproducibility, it includes a well-established definition of concussion, and is used to collect detailed information on each concussion allowing for a number of subgroup analyses (e.g. by severity, by age, by context). The BRAIN-Q is easily adaptable to other sporting settings

Type: Article
Title: The BRAIN-Q, a tool for assessing self-reported sport-related concussions for epidemiological studies
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.4178/epih.e2021086
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.4178/epih.e2021086
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Questionnaire; Evaluation; Sport-related concussion; Self-reported exposure
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Targeted Intervention
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10137254
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