UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Visual Impairment, Eye Diseases, and Dementia Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Kuźma, E; Littlejohns, TJ; Khawaja, AP; Llewellyn, DJ; Ukoumunne, OC; Thiem, U; (2021) Visual Impairment, Eye Diseases, and Dementia Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease , 83 (3) pp. 1073-1087. 10.3233/JAD-210250. Green open access

[thumbnail of Kuzma_MS_SR_Visual imp_final_Manuscript 21-0250R2.pdf]
Preview
Text
Kuzma_MS_SR_Visual imp_final_Manuscript 21-0250R2.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (809kB) | Preview
[thumbnail of Kuzma_Supplementary Material_21-0250R2.pdf]
Preview
Text
Kuzma_Supplementary Material_21-0250R2.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (757kB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Visual impairment and eye diseases have been associated with dementia, though with mixed findings and often in cross-sectional studies. OBJECTIVE: To identify prospective studies investigating associations between visual impairment or common eye diseases and risk of all-cause dementia or key dementia subtypes. METHODS: We searched Medline, PsycINFO, and Embase from inception to January 2020. We also conducted backward and forward citation searches of included studies and set up alerts to identify studies published after the search date. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to combine adjusted estimates across studies. RESULTS: Thirty studies met our eligibility criteria. For visual impairment, pooled estimates indicated an increased risk of all-cause dementia (37,705 participants, 3,415 cases, risk ratio [RR] = 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-1.59, I2 = 28.6%). Pooled estimates also suggested an increased dementia risk associated with cataract (6,659 participants, 1,312 cases, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.00-1.38, I2 = 0.0%) and diabetic retinopathy (43,658 participants, 7,060 cases, HR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.11-1.61, I2 = 63.9%), respectively. There was no evidence of an association between glaucoma (175,357 participants, 44,144 cases, HR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.90-1.04, I2 = 51.5%) or age-related macular degeneration (7,800,692 participants, > 2,559 cases, HR = 1.15, 95% CI: 0.88-1.50, I2 = 91.0%) and risk of dementia, respectively. CONCLUSION: As visual impairment, cataract, and diabetic retinopathy are associated with an increased likelihood of developing dementia, early diagnosis may help identify those at risk of dementia. Given most causes of visual impairment are treatable or preventable, the potential for dementia prevention warrants further investigation.

Type: Article
Title: Visual Impairment, Eye Diseases, and Dementia Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3233/JAD-210250
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-210250
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, eye diseases, prospective studies, vision disorders
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10137068
Downloads since deposit
99Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item