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Organizational Justice and Long-term Metabolic Trajectories: A 25-Year Follow-up of the Whitehall II Cohort

Varga, TV; Xu, T; Kivimäki, M; Mehta, AJ; Rugulies, R; Rod, NH; (2022) Organizational Justice and Long-term Metabolic Trajectories: A 25-Year Follow-up of the Whitehall II Cohort. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism , 107 (2) pp. 398-409. 10.1210/clinem/dgab704. Green open access

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Abstract

CONTEXT: Organizational justice has been linked to lower risk of several chronic conditions among employees, but less is known about the long-term mechanisms underlying this risk reduction. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether self-reported organizational justice is associated with individual and composite metabolic trajectories. DESIGN: 25 years follow-up of the Whitehall II prospective cohort study. SETTING: Middle-aged public servants from the United Kingdom. PARTICIPANTS: Data on 8,182 participants were used. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Levels of eleven anthropometric, glycaemic, lipid and blood pressure biomarkers were measured at five timepoints (1991-2013). We used generalized estimating equations and group-based trajectory modelling to investigate the relationship between organizational justice and biomarker trajectories. RESULTS: High vs. low organizational justice were associated with lower waist (-1.7 cm) and hip (-1 cm) circumference, BMI (-0.6 kg/m 2), triglycerides (-1.07 mmol/L) and fasting insulin (-1.08 µIU/mL) trajectories. Two latent metabolic trajectory clusters were identified: a high-risk and a low-risk cluster. High organizational justice (vs. low) were associated with belonging to the low-risk cluster (ORpooled=1.47). The low-risk cluster demonstrated lower baseline levels of most biomarkers and better glycaemic control, whereas the high-risk cluster showed higher baseline levels of most biomarkers, glycaemic deterioration, but also greater improvements in lipid levels over time. CONCLUSIONS: People with high organizational justice had more favourable long-term cardiometabolic biomarkers patterns than those with low organizational justice, a potential mechanism contributing to the lower risk of chronic diseases in the first group. Further intervention studies are warranted to determine whether improvement of organizational justice might improve long-term health.

Type: Article
Title: Organizational Justice and Long-term Metabolic Trajectories: A 25-Year Follow-up of the Whitehall II Cohort
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1210/clinem/dgab704
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1210/clinem/dgab704
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions.
Keywords: cardiometabolic, latent cluster analysis, metabolic disease, organizational justice, relational justice, trajectory
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10136234
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