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A retrospective study on long-term efficacy of intranasal lysine-aspirin in controlling NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease

Pendolino, AL; Scadding, GK; Scarpa, B; Andrews, PJ; (2021) A retrospective study on long-term efficacy of intranasal lysine-aspirin in controlling NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease. European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology 10.1007/s00405-021-07063-2. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Purpose: Aspirin treatment after desensitization (ATAD) represents an effective therapeutic option suitable for NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease (N-ERD) patients with recalcitrant disease. Intranasal administration of lysine-aspirin (LAS) has been suggested as a safer and faster route than oral ATAD but evidence for its use is less strong. We investigated nasal LAS therapy long-term efficacy based on objective outcomes, smell function, polyp recurrence and need for surgery or rescue therapy. Clinical biomarkers predicting response to intranasal LAS, long-term side effects and consequences of discontinuing treatment have been evaluated. Methods: A retrospective analysis of a database of 60 N-ERD patients seen between 2012 and 2020 was performed in March 2021. They were followed up at 3-months, 1-, 2- and 3-years with upper and lower airway functions assessed at each follow-up. Results: Higher nasal airflow and smell scores were found at each follow-up in patients taking LAS (p < 0.001 and p = 0.048 respectively). No influence of LAS on pulmonary function measurements was observed. Patient on intranasal LAS showed a lower rate of revision sinus surgery when compared to those who discontinued the treatment (p < 0.001). None of the variables studied was found to influence LAS treatment response. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates the clinical effectiveness of long-term intranasal LAS in the management of N-ERD in terms of improved nasal airflow and olfaction and a reduced need for revision sinus surgery. Intranasal LAS is safe, being associated with a lower rate of side effects when compared to oral ATAD. However, discontinuation of the treatment at any stage is associated with a loss of clinical benefit.

Type: Article
Title: A retrospective study on long-term efficacy of intranasal lysine-aspirin in controlling NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00405-021-07063-2
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00405-021-07063-2
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Otorhinolaryngology, Anti-inflammatory agents non-steroidal, Asthma, Aspirin-induced, Nasal polyps, Smell, Aspirin, NASAL POLYPOSIS, DESENSITIZATION-TREATMENT, CHRONIC RHINOSINUSITIS, ASTHMA, ACETYLSALICYLATE, CHALLENGE
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > The Ear Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10136176
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