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Child's Gender, Young Fathers' Crime, and Spillover Effects in Criminal Behavior

Dustmann, C; Landerso, R; (2021) Child's Gender, Young Fathers' Crime, and Spillover Effects in Criminal Behavior. Journal of Political Economy , 129 (12) pp. 3261-3301. 10.1086/716562. Green open access

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Abstract

Men who father their first child at a very young age are convicted of significantly fewer crimes in the first years after birth if the child is a son rather than a daughter. This leads to behavioral spillovers that reduce criminal convictions among other young men living in the same neighborhood, with the resulting crime multipliers affecting peers’ crime even after the primary impact on the focal individual has dissipated. Through social multipliers, prevention policies that target potential criminals at an early stage, therefore, lead to larger reductions in the cost of crime than suggested by primary effects alone.

Type: Article
Title: Child's Gender, Young Fathers' Crime, and Spillover Effects in Criminal Behavior
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1086/716562
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1086/716562
Language: English
Additional information: © 2021 The University of Chicago. All rights reserved. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Dept of Economics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10136134
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