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Organizational contextual factors that predict success of a quality improvement collaborative approach to enhance integrated HIV-tuberculosis services: a sub-study of the Scaling up TB/HIV Integration trial

Gengiah, S; Connolly, C; Yende-Zuma, N; Barker, PM; Nunn, AJ; Padayatchi, N; Taylor, M; ... Naidoo, K; + view all (2021) Organizational contextual factors that predict success of a quality improvement collaborative approach to enhance integrated HIV-tuberculosis services: a sub-study of the Scaling up TB/HIV Integration trial. Implementation Science , 16 (1) , Article 88. 10.1186/s13012-021-01155-7. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: A quality improvement (QI) collaborative approach to enhancing integrated HIV-Tuberculosis (TB) services may be effective in scaling up and improving the quality of service delivery. Little is known of the role of organizational contextual factors (OCFs) in influencing the success of QI collaboratives. This study aims to determine which OCFs were associated with improvement in a QI collaborative intervention to enhance integrated HIV-TB services delivery. Methods: This is a nested sub-study embedded in a cluster-randomized controlled trial. Sixteen nurse supervisors (clusters) overseeing 40 clinics were randomized (1:1) to receive QI training and mentorship, or standard of care support (SOC). In the QI arm, eight nurse supervisors and 20 clinics formed a “collaborative” which aimed to improve HIV-TB process indicators, namely HIV testing, TB screening, isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) initiations, viral load testing, and antiretroviral therapy for TB patients. OCFs measured at baseline were physical infrastructure, key staff, flexibility of clinic hours, monitoring data for improvement (MDI), and leadership support. Surveys were administered to clinic staff at baseline and month 12 to assess perceptions of supportiveness of contexts for change, and clinic organization for delivering integrated HIV-TB services. Linear mixed modelling was used to test for associations between OCFs and HIV-TB process indicators. Results: A total of 209 clinic staff participated in the study; 97 (46.4%) and 112 (53.6%) from QI and SOC arms, respectively. There were no differences between the QI and SOC arms scores achieved for physical infrastructure (78.9% vs 64.7%; p = 0.058), key staff (95.8 vs 92; p = 0.270), clinic hours (66.9 vs 65.5; p = 0.900), MDI (63.3 vs 65; p = 0.875, leadership support (46.0 vs 57.4; p = 0.265), and perceptions of supportiveness of contexts for change (76.2 vs 79.7; p = 0.128 and clinic organization for delivering integrated HIV-TB services (74.1 vs 80.1; p = 0.916). IPT initiation was the only indicator that was significantly improved in the parent study. MDI was a significantly associated with increasing IPT initiation rates [beta coefficient (β) = 0.004; p = 0.004]. Discussion: MDI is a practice that should be fostered in public health facilities to increase the likelihood of success of future QI collaboratives to improve HIV-TB service delivery. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02654613. Registered 01 June 2015.

Type: Article
Title: Organizational contextual factors that predict success of a quality improvement collaborative approach to enhance integrated HIV-tuberculosis services: a sub-study of the Scaling up TB/HIV Integration trial
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s13012-021-01155-7
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13012-021-01155-7
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
Keywords: Quality improvement collaboratives, HIV-TB integration, Cluster-randomized trial, Organizational contextual factors, South Africa, IMPLEMENTATION, OUTCOMES, CLINICS
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Inst of Clinical Trials and Methodology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Inst of Clinical Trials and Methodology > MRC Clinical Trials Unit at UCL
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10135809
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