UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Domestic Coercive Control and Common Mental Disorders Among Women in Informal Settlements in Mumbai, India: A Cross-Sectional Survey

Kanougiya, S; Daruwalla, N; Gram, L; Sivakami, M; Osrin, D; (2022) Domestic Coercive Control and Common Mental Disorders Among Women in Informal Settlements in Mumbai, India: A Cross-Sectional Survey. Journal of Interpersonal Violence , 37 (19-20) , Article NP17934–NP17959. 10.1177/08862605211030293. Green open access

[thumbnail of Osrin_JIV_21_230_accepted_version.pdf]
Preview
Text
Osrin_JIV_21_230_accepted_version.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (451kB) | Preview

Abstract

Coercive control behaviors central to the abuse of power appear more frequent than other types of domestic violence, but little is known about its frequency, features, and consequences for women in India. We aimed to examine the prevalence of domestic coercive control and its association with physical, sexual, and emotional domestic violence in the preceding year and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and suicidal thinking. In a cross-sectional survey, we interviewed 4,906 ever-married women aged 18-49 years living in urban informal settlements in Mumbai, India. We developed a 24-item scale of coercive control, assessed physical, sexual, and emotional violence using existing questions, and screened for symptoms of depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9), anxiety with the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD7) questionnaire, and suicidal thinking with questions developed by the World Health Organization. Estimates involved univariable and multivariable logistic regression models and the prediction of marginal effects. The prevalence of domestic coercive control was 71%. In total, 23% of women reported domestic violence in the past 12 months (emotional 19%, physical 13%, sexual 4%). Adjusted models suggested that women exposed to controlling behavior had greater odds of surviving emotional (aOR 2.1; 95% CI 1.7, 2.7), physical (1.4; 1.0, 1.9), and sexual (1.8; 1.1, 3.0) domestic violence in the past 12 months; and higher odds of a positive screen for moderate or severe depression (1.7; 1.3, 2.2), anxiety (2.1; 1.3, 3.1), and suicidal thinking (1.7; 1.2, 2.3), and increased with each additional indicator of coercive control behavior. When women reported 24 indicators of coercive control, the adjusted predicted proportion with moderate or severe depressive symptoms was 60%, anxiety 42%, and suicidal thinking 17%. Inclusion of coercive control in programs to support domestic violence, would broaden our understanding of domestic abuse to resemble most victims experience and improve interventions.

Type: Article
Title: Domestic Coercive Control and Common Mental Disorders Among Women in Informal Settlements in Mumbai, India: A Cross-Sectional Survey
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/08862605211030293
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1177/08862605211030293
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For the purpose of Open Access, the authors have applied a CC BY public copyright license to any author accepted manuscript version arising from this submission.
Keywords: coercive control, domestic violence, common mental disorder, India
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10135084
Downloads since deposit
638Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item