UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

The Gut Microbiota and Their Metabolites in Human Arterial Stiffness

Dinakis, E; Nakai, M; Gill, PA; Yiallourou, S; Sata, Y; Muir, J; Carrington, M; ... Marques, FZ; + view all (2021) The Gut Microbiota and Their Metabolites in Human Arterial Stiffness. Heart Lung and Circulation , 30 (11) pp. 1716-1725. 10.1016/j.hlc.2021.07.022. Green open access

[thumbnail of The Gut Microbiota and Their Metabolites in Human Arterial Stiffness.pdf]
Preview
Text
The Gut Microbiota and Their Metabolites in Human Arterial Stiffness.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Aim: Gut microbiota-derived metabolites, such as short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) have vasodilator properties in animal and human ex vivo arteries. However, the role of the gut microbiota and SCFAs in arterial stiffness in humans is still unclear. Here we aimed to determine associations between the gut microbiome, SCFA and their G-protein coupled sensing receptors (GPCRs) in relation to human arterial stiffness. / Methods: Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) was determined from ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring in 69 participants from regional and metropolitan regions in Australia (55.1% women; mean, 59.8± SD, 7.26 years of age). The gut microbiome was determined by 16S rRNA sequencing, SCFA levels by gas chromatography, and GPCR expression in circulating immune cells by real-time PCR. / Results: There was no association between metrics of bacterial α and β diversity and AASI or AASI quartiles in men and women. We identified two main bacteria taxa that were associated with AASI quartiles: Lactobacillus spp. was only present in the lowest quartile, while Clostridium spp. was present in all quartiles but the lowest. AASI was positively associated with higher levels of plasma, but not faecal, butyrate. Finally, we identified that the expression of GPR43 (FFAR2) and GPR41 (FFAR3) in circulating immune cells were negatively associated with AASI. / Conclusions: Our results suggest that arterial stiffness is associated with lower levels of the metabolite-sensing receptors GPR41/GPR43 in humans, blunting its response to BP-lowering metabolites such as butyrate. The role of Lactobacillus spp. and Clostridium spp., as well as butyrate-sensing receptors GPR41/GPR43, in human arterial stiffness needs to be determined.

Type: Article
Title: The Gut Microbiota and Their Metabolites in Human Arterial Stiffness
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.hlc.2021.07.022
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hlc.2021.07.022
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Arterial stiffness, Pulse wave velocity, Metagenome, Short-chain fatty acids
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute > Microbial Diseases
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10134898
Downloads since deposit
318Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item