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Bioengineering bacterial encapsulin nanocompartments as targeted drug delivery system

Van de Steen, A; Khalife, R; Colant, N; Mustafa Khan, H; Deveikis, M; Charalambous, S; Robinson, CM; ... Frank, S; + view all (2021) Bioengineering bacterial encapsulin nanocompartments as targeted drug delivery system. Synthetic and Systems Biotechnology , 6 (3) pp. 231-241. 10.1016/j.synbio.2021.09.001. Green open access

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Abstract

The development of Drug Delivery Systems (DDS) has led to increasingly efficient therapies for the treatment and detection of various diseases. DDS use a range of nanoscale delivery platforms produced from polymeric of inorganic materials, such as micelles, and metal and polymeric nanoparticles, but their variant chemical composition make alterations to their size, shape, or structures inherently complex. Genetically encoded protein nanocages are highly promising DDS candidates because of their modular composition, ease of recombinant production in a range of hosts, control over assembly and loading of cargo molecules and biodegradability. One example of naturally occurring nanocompartments are encapsulins, recently discovered bacterial organelles that have been shown to be reprogrammable as nanobioreactors and vaccine candidates. Here we report the design and application of a targeted DDS platform based on the Thermotoga maritima encapsulin reprogrammed to display an antibody mimic protein called Designed Ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin) on the outer surface and to encapsulate a cytotoxic payload. The DARPin9.29 chosen in this study specifically binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on breast cancer cells, as demonstrated in an in vitro cell culture model. The encapsulin-based DDS is assembled in one step in vivo by co-expressing the encapsulin-DARPin9.29 fusion protein with an engineered flavin-binding protein mini-singlet oxygen generator (MiniSOG), from a single plasmid in Escherichia coli. Purified encapsulin-DARPin_miniSOG nanocompartments bind specifically to HER2 positive breast cancer cells and trigger apoptosis, indicating that the system is functional and specific. The DDS is modular and has the potential to form the basis of a multi-receptor targeted system by utilising the DARPin screening libraries, allowing use of new DARPins of known specificities, and through the proven flexibility of the encapsulin cargo loading mechanism, allowing selection of cargo proteins of choice.

Type: Article
Title: Bioengineering bacterial encapsulin nanocompartments as targeted drug delivery system
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.synbio.2021.09.001
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.synbio.2021.09.001
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Encapsulin, Drug delivery system, Cytotoxic protein, DARPin
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Biochemical Engineering
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Chemical Engineering
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10134658
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