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Association of shift work with mood disorders and sleep problems according to chronotype: a 17-year cohort study

Cheng, W-J; Puttonen, S; Vanttola, P; Koskinen, A; Kivimäki, M; Härmä, M; (2021) Association of shift work with mood disorders and sleep problems according to chronotype: a 17-year cohort study. Chronobiology International , 38 (4) pp. 518-525. 10.1080/07420528.2021.1885431.

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Abstract

Both evening chronotype and shift work are associated with depressive symptoms. This study examined whether the association between shift work and mood disorders and sleep problems varies by chronotype. The study population included 10637 participants from the Finnish Hospital Personnel Cohort Study. Work schedule was assessed using repeated questionnaires between 2000 and 2017. Chronotype, assessed using a single item from the Diurnal Type Scale, was categorized into definite morning, somewhat morning, somewhat evening, and definite evening types. The presence of mood disorders was identified by the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. Sleep problems were assessed by self-reported frequency of difficulty falling asleep and maintaining asleep. Longitudinal fixed effects models were used to examine the associations between shift work and the presence of mood disorders and sleep problems, stratified by chronotype. We found that fixed night work was associated with mood disorders among somewhat evening (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.91, 95% CI 1.09-3.34) and definite evening-type workers (adjusted OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.06-3.98). Shift work with night shifts was associated with mood disorders among definite evening-type workers (adjusted OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.18-2.60). Similarly, fixed night work was associated with difficulty maintaining sleep only among evening-type workers. In conclusion, evening chronotype increase the vulnerability to mood disorders and sleep disturbances related to night work.

Type: Article
Title: Association of shift work with mood disorders and sleep problems according to chronotype: a 17-year cohort study
Location: England
DOI: 10.1080/07420528.2021.1885431
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07420528.2021.1885431
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Anxiety, chronotype, depression, eveningness, morningness, night work, sleep
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10134341
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