UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Genetic overlap and causal associations between smoking behaviours and mental health

Barkhuizen, W; Dudbridge, F; Ronald, A; (2021) Genetic overlap and causal associations between smoking behaviours and mental health. Scientific Reports , 11 , Article 14871. 10.1038/s41598-021-93962-7. Green open access

[thumbnail of Genetic overlap and causal associations between smoking behaviours and mental health.pdf]
Preview
Text
Genetic overlap and causal associations between smoking behaviours and mental health.pdf - Published version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Cigarette smoking is a modifiable behaviour associated with mental health. We investigated the degree of genetic overlap between smoking behaviours and psychiatric traits and disorders, and whether genetic associations exist beyond genetic influences shared with confounding variables (cannabis and alcohol use, risk-taking and insomnia). Second, we investigated the presence of causal associations between smoking initiation and psychiatric traits and disorders. We found significant genetic correlations between smoking and psychiatric disorders and adult psychotic experiences. When genetic influences on known covariates were controlled for, genetic associations between most smoking behaviours and schizophrenia and depression endured (but not with bipolar disorder or most psychotic experiences). Mendelian randomization results supported a causal role of smoking initiation on psychiatric disorders and adolescent cognitive and negative psychotic experiences, although not consistently across all sensitivity analyses. In conclusion, smoking and psychiatric disorders share genetic influences that cannot be attributed to covariates such as risk-taking, insomnia or other substance use. As such, there may be some common genetic pathways underlying smoking and psychiatric disorders. In addition, smoking may play a causal role in vulnerability for mental illness.

Type: Article
Title: Genetic overlap and causal associations between smoking behaviours and mental health
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-021-93962-7
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-93962-7
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION, PSYCHOTIC-LIKE EXPERIENCES, MENDELIAN RANDOMIZATION, GENERAL-POPULATION, CIGARETTE-SMOKING, BIPOLAR DISORDER, TOBACCO SMOKING, SUBSTANCE USE, CANNABIS USE, RISK-TAKING
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10134328
Downloads since deposit
8Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item