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Behavioural Lifestyle Intervention Study (BLIS) in patients with type 2 diabetes in the United Arab Emirates: A randomized controlled trial

Abdi, S; Sadiya, A; Ali, S; Varghese, S; Abusnana, S; (2015) Behavioural Lifestyle Intervention Study (BLIS) in patients with type 2 diabetes in the United Arab Emirates: A randomized controlled trial. BMC Nutrition , 1 , Article 37. 10.1186/s40795-015-0028-4. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Lifestyle modification is a cornerstone of the management of type 2 diabetes. However, in the United Arab Emirates, a country where type 2 diabetes is highly prevalent, non-compliance with a healthy lifestyle has been reported in many diabetic Emirati patients. The use of behavioural theories in lifestyle counselling is believed to facilitate behavioural changes, nevertheless, there are no published data regarding the use of structured behavioural lifestyle programmes tailored to suit Emirati culture. The primary objective of this study was to develop a behavioural lifestyle programme and to evaluate its effectiveness in improving glycaemic control in Emirati patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: The Behavioural Lifestyle Intervention Study (BLIS) was a translational randomized controlled trial in which patients (n = 35) were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Patients in the intervention group went through a six-month behavioural lifestyle programme composed of 8 sessions, whereas patients in the control group received standard care. Cognitive behavioural theory was the underpinning theory for the lifestyle intervention. HbA1c levels were the trial’s primary outcome measure, and the main dietary factor targeted for change was carbohydrate intake. They were measured at baseline, 3 months and 6 months and were assessed using one-way ANOVA at a significance level of P < 0.05. All of the patients were then followed up at 1 year on all outcome measures. RESULTS: At 6 months, the HbA1c levels of the patients (n = 18) in the intervention group were significantly reduced (−1.56 ± 1.81, P < 0.05), whereas no significant change was observed in the patients of the control group. Similarly, both carbohydrate intake from cereals and total carbohydrate intake (in grams) were reduced (p < 0.05) in the intervention group, by 32.92 ± 54.34 and 20.94 ± 56.73, respectively. At 1 year, the patients in the intervention group maintained a significant reduction in HbA1c levels (−1.12 ± 1.46, p < 0.05), whereas no change was observed in the control group. CONCLUSION: The behavioural lifestyle intervention programme was effective in improving glycaemic control and compliance with carbohydrate intake goals in Emirati patients with type 2 diabetes. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to validate these results and to identify key behavioural strategies that will improve compliance to lifestyle modifications in real life. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov trial identifier NCT02386930

Type: Article
Title: Behavioural Lifestyle Intervention Study (BLIS) in patients with type 2 diabetes in the United Arab Emirates: A randomized controlled trial
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s40795-015-0028-4
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40795-015-0028-4
Language: English
Additional information: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: UAE, Lifestyle, Cognitive behavioural theory, type 2 diabetes
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > UCL Interaction Centre
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10134193
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