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Elimination of glutamatergic transmission from Hb9 interneurons does not impact treadmill locomotion

Koronfel, LM; Kanning, KC; Alcos, A; Henderson, CE; Brownstone, RM; (2021) Elimination of glutamatergic transmission from Hb9 interneurons does not impact treadmill locomotion. Scientific Reports , 11 , Article 16008. 10.1038/s41598-021-95143-y. Green open access

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Abstract

The spinal cord contains neural circuits that can produce the rhythm and pattern of locomotor activity. It has previously been postulated that a population of glutamatergic neurons, termed Hb9 interneurons, contributes to locomotor rhythmogenesis. These neurons were identified by their expression of the homeobox gene, Hb9, which is also expressed in motor neurons. We developed a mouse line in which Cre recombinase activity is inducible in neurons expressing Hb9. We then used this line to eliminate vesicular glutamate transporter 2 from Hb9 interneurons, and found that there were no deficits in treadmill locomotion. We conclude that glutamatergic neurotransmission by Hb9 interneurons is not required for locomotor behaviour. The role of these neurons in neural circuits remains elusive.

Type: Article
Title: Elimination of glutamatergic transmission from Hb9 interneurons does not impact treadmill locomotion
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-021-95143-y
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-95143-y
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. Te images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10133774
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