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The relationship of symptom dimensions with premorbid adjustment and cognitive characteristics at first episode psychosis: Findings from the EU-GEI study

Ferraro, L; La Cascia, C; La Barbera, D; Sanchez-Gutierrez, T; Tripoli, G; Seminerio, F; Sartorio, C; ... Quattrone, D; + view all (2021) The relationship of symptom dimensions with premorbid adjustment and cognitive characteristics at first episode psychosis: Findings from the EU-GEI study. Schizophrenia Research , 236 pp. 69-79. 10.1016/j.schres.2021.08.008. Green open access

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Abstract

Premorbid functioning and cognitive measures may reflect gradients of developmental impairment across diagnostic categories in psychosis. In this study, we sought to examine the associations of current cognition and premorbid adjustment with symptom dimensions in a large first episode psychosis (FEP) sample. We used data from the international EU-GEI study. Bifactor modelling of the Operational Criteria in Studies of Psychotic Illness (OPCRIT) ratings provided general and specific symptom dimension scores. Premorbid Adjustment Scale estimated premorbid social (PSF) and academic adjustment (PAF), and WAIS-brief version measured IQ. A MANCOVA model examined the relationship between symptom dimensions and PSF, PAF, and IQ, having age, sex, country, self-ascribed ethnicity and frequency of cannabis use as confounders. In 785 patients, better PSF was associated with fewer negative (B = −0.12, 95% C.I. −0.18, −0.06, p < 0.001) and depressive (B = −0.09, 95% C.I. −0.15, −0.03, p = 0.032), and more manic (B = 0.07, 95% C.I. 0.01, 0.14, p = 0.023) symptoms. Patients with a lower IQ presented with slightly more negative and positive, and fewer manic, symptoms. Secondary analysis on IQ subdomains revealed associations between better perceptual reasoning and fewer negative (B = −0.09, 95% C.I. −0.17, −0.01, p = 0.023) and more manic (B = 0.10, 95% C.I. 0.02, 0.18, p = 0.014) symptoms. Fewer positive symptoms were associated with better processing speed (B = −0.12, 95% C.I. −0.02, −0.004, p = 0.003) and working memory (B = −0.10, 95% C.I. −0.18, −0.01, p = 0.024). These findings suggest that the negative and manic symptom dimensions may serve as clinical proxies of different neurodevelopmental predisposition in psychosis.

Type: Article
Title: The relationship of symptom dimensions with premorbid adjustment and cognitive characteristics at first episode psychosis: Findings from the EU-GEI study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.schres.2021.08.008
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2021.08.008
Language: English
Additional information: © 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10133663
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