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Joint attacks and accrual in argumentation frameworks

Bikakis, A; Cohen, A; Dvorák, W; Flouris, G; Parsons, S; (2021) Joint attacks and accrual in argumentation frameworks. Journal of Applied Logics , 8 (6) pp. 1437-1501. Green open access

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Abstract

While modelling arguments, it is often useful to represent “joint attacks”, i.e., cases where multiple arguments jointly attack another (note that this is different from the case where multiple arguments attack another in isolation). Based on this remark, the notion of joint attacks has been proposed as a useful extension of classical Abstract Argumentation Frameworks, and has been shown to constitute a genuine extension in terms of expressive power. In this chapter, we review various works considering the notion of joint attacks from various perspectives, including abstract and structured frameworks. Moreover, we present results detailing the relation among frameworks with joint attacks and classical argumentation frameworks, computational aspects, and applications of joint attacks. Last but not least, we propose a roadmap for future research on the subject, identifying gaps in current research and important research directions.

Type: Article
Title: Joint attacks and accrual in argumentation frameworks
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version: http://www.collegepublications.co.uk/downloads/ifc...
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of Arts and Humanities
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of Arts and Humanities > Dept of Information Studies
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10133658
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