UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Reduced antibody cross-reactivity following infection with B.1.1.7 than with parental SARS-CoV-2 strains

Faulkner, N; Ng, KW; Wu, MY; Harvey, R; Margaritis, M; Paraskevopoulou, S; Houlihan, C; ... Kassiotis, G; + view all (2021) Reduced antibody cross-reactivity following infection with B.1.1.7 than with parental SARS-CoV-2 strains. eLife , 10 , Article e69317. 10.7554/eLife.69317. Green open access

[thumbnail of elife-69317-v1.pdf]
Preview
Text
elife-69317-v1.pdf - Published Version

Download (16MB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: The degree of heterotypic immunity induced by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) strains is a major determinant of the spread of emerging variants and the success of vaccination campaigns, but remains incompletely understood. Methods: We examined the immunogenicity of SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.1.7 (Alpha) that arose in the United Kingdom and spread globally. We determined titres of spike glycoprotein-binding antibodies and authentic virus neutralising antibodies induced by B.1.1.7 infection to infer homotypic and heterotypic immunity. Results: Antibodies elicited by B.1.1.7 infection exhibited significantly reduced recognition and neutralisation of parental strains or of the South Africa variant B.1.351 (Beta) than of the infecting variant. The drop in cross-reactivity was significantly more pronounced following B.1.1.7 than parental strain infection. Conclusions: The results indicate that heterotypic immunity induced by SARS-CoV-2 variants is asymmetric.

Type: Article
Title: Reduced antibody cross-reactivity following infection with B.1.1.7 than with parental SARS-CoV-2 strains
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.7554/eLife.69317
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.69317
Additional information: © 2021, Faulkner et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.
Keywords: epidemiology, global health, human, infectious disease, microbiology, viruses
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Renal Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10132281
Downloads since deposit
36Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item