UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Use of the margin of stability to quantify stability in pathologic gait - a qualitative systematic review

Watson, F; Fino, PC; Thornton, M; Heracleous, C; Loureiro, R; Leong, JJH; (2021) Use of the margin of stability to quantify stability in pathologic gait - a qualitative systematic review. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders , 22 (1) , Article 597. 10.1186/s12891-021-04466-4. Green open access

[thumbnail of s12891-021-04466-4.pdf]
Preview
Text
s12891-021-04466-4.pdf - Published Version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The Margin of Stability (MoS) is a widely used objective measure of dynamic stability during gait. Increasingly, researchers are using the MoS to assess the stability of pathological populations to gauge their stability capabilities and coping strategies, or as an objective marker of outcome, response to treatment or disease progression. The objectives are; to describe the types of pathological gait that are assessed using the MoS, to examine the methods used to assess MoS and to examine the way the MoS data is presented and interpreted. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Guidelines (PRISMA) in the following databases: Web of Science, PubMed, UCL Library Explore, Cochrane Library, Scopus. All articles measured the MoS of a pathologically affected adult human population whilst walking in a straight line. Extracted data were collected per a prospectively defined list, which included: population type, method of data analysis and model building, walking tasks undertaken, and interpretation of the MoS. RESULTS: Thirty-one studies were included in the final review. More than 15 different clinical populations were studied, most commonly post-stroke and unilateral transtibial amputee populations. Most participants were assessed in a gait laboratory using motion capture technology, whilst 2 studies used instrumented shoes. A variety of centre of mass, base of support and MoS definitions and calculations were described. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first systematic review to assess use of the MoS and the first to consider its clinical application. Findings suggest the MoS has potential to be a helpful, objective measurement in a variety of clinically affected populations. Unfortunately, the methodology and interpretation varies, which hinders subsequent study comparisons. A lack of baseline results from large studies mean direct comparison between studies is difficult and strong conclusions are hard to make. Further work from the biomechanics community to develop reporting guidelines for MoS calculation methodology and a commitment to larger baseline studies for each pathology is welcomed.

Type: Article
Title: Use of the margin of stability to quantify stability in pathologic gait - a qualitative systematic review
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s12891-021-04466-4
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12891-021-04466-4
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made.
Keywords: Base of support, Dynamic stability margin, Extrapolated Centre of Mass, Margin of stability, Stroke, Transtibial amputation, XcoM, Adaptation, Psychological, Adult, Biomechanical Phenomena, Gait, Humans, Postural Balance, Walking
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Ortho and MSK Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10130899
Downloads since deposit
59Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item