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Impact of replacing sedentary behaviour with other movement behaviours on depression and anxiety symptoms: a prospective cohort study in the UK Biobank

Kandola, AA; del Pozo Cruz, B; Osborn, DPJ; Stubbs, B; Choi, KW; Hayes, JF; (2021) Impact of replacing sedentary behaviour with other movement behaviours on depression and anxiety symptoms: a prospective cohort study in the UK Biobank. BMC Medicine , 19 (1) 10.1186/s12916-021-02007-3. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Sedentary behaviour is potentially a modifiable risk factor for depression and anxiety disorders, but findings have been inconsistent. To assess the associations of sedentary behaviour with depression and anxiety symptoms and estimate the impact of replacing daily time spent in sedentary behaviours with sleep, light, or moderate to vigorous physical activity, using compositional data analysis methods. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study in 60,235 UK Biobank participants (mean age: 56; 56% female). Exposure was baseline daily movement behaviours (accelerometer-assessed sedentary behaviour and physical activity, and self-reported total sleep). Outcomes were depression and anxiety symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and Generalised Anxiety Disorders-7) at follow-up. Results: Replacing 60 min of sedentary behaviour with light activity, moderate-to-vigorous activity, and sleep was associated with lower depression symptom scores by 1.3% (95% CI, 0.4–2.1%), 12.5% (95% CI, 11.4–13.5%), and 7.6% (95% CI, 6.9–8.4%), and lower odds of possible depression by 0.95 (95% CI, 0.94–0.96), 0.75 (95% CI, 0.74–0.76), and 0.90 (95% CI, 0.90–0.91) at follow-up. Replacing 60 min of sedentary behaviour with moderate-to-vigorous activity and sleep was associated with lower anxiety symptom scores by 6.6% (95% CI, 5.5–7.6%) and 4.5% (95% CI, 3.7–5.2%), and lower odds of meeting the threshold for a possible anxiety disorder by 0.90 (95% CI, 0.89–0.90) and 0.97 (95%CI, 0.96–0.97) at follow-up. However, replacing 60 min of sedentary behaviour with light activity was associated with higher anxiety symptom scores by 4.5% (95% CI, 3.7–5.3%) and higher odds of a possible anxiety disorder by 1.07 (95% CI, 1.06–1.08). Conclusions: Sedentary behaviour is a risk factor for increased depression and anxiety symptoms in adults. Replacing sedentary behaviour with moderate-to-vigorous activity may reduce mental health risks, but more work is necessary to clarify the role of light activity.

Type: Article
Title: Impact of replacing sedentary behaviour with other movement behaviours on depression and anxiety symptoms: a prospective cohort study in the UK Biobank
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s12916-021-02007-3
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12916-021-02007-3
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made.
Keywords: Sedentary behaviour; Depression; Anxiety; Compositional; Physical activity; MVPA
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10130526
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