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Inflammation and microbial translocation measured prior to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and long-term probability of clinical progression in people living with HIV

Merlini, E; Cozzi-lepri, A; Castagna, A; Costantini, A; Lo Caputo, S; Carrara, S; Roldan, EQ; ... Marchetti, G; + view all (2021) Inflammation and microbial translocation measured prior to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and long-term probability of clinical progression in people living with HIV. BMC Infectious Diseases , 21 (1) , Article 557. 10.1186/s12879-021-06260-y. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Despite the effectiveness of cART, people living with HIV still experience an increased risk of serious non-AIDS events, as compared to the HIV negative population. Whether pre-cART microbial translocation (MT) and systemic inflammation might predict morbidity/mortality during suppressive cART, independently of other known risk factors, is still unclear. Thus, we aimed to investigate the role of pre-cART inflammation and MT as predictors of clinical progression in HIV+ patients enrolled in the Icona Foundation Study Cohort. Methods: We included Icona patients with ≥2 vials of plasma stored within 6 months before cART initiation and at least one CD4 count after therapy available. Circulating biomarker: LPS, sCD14, EndoCab, hs-CRP. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression models were used. We defined the endpoint of clinical progression as the occurrence of a new AIDS-defining condition, severe non-AIDS condition (SNAEs) or death whichever occurred first. Follow-up accrued from the data of starting cART and was censored at the time of last available clinical visit. Biomarkers were evaluated as both binary (above/below median) and continuous variables (logescale). Results: We studied 486 patients with 125 clinical events: 39 (31%) AIDS, 66 (53%) SNAEs and 20 (16%) deaths. Among the analyzed MT and pro-inflammatory markers, hs-CRP seemed to be the only biomarker retaining some association with the endpoint of clinical progression (i.e. AIDS/SNAEs/death) after adjustment for confounders, both when the study population was stratified according to the median of the distribution (1.51 mg/L) and when the study population was stratified according to the 33% percentiles of the distribution (low 0.0–1.1 mg/L; intermediate 1.2–5.3 mg/L; high > 5.3 mg/L). In particular, the higher the hs-CRP values, the higher the risk of clinical progression (p = 0.056 for median-based model; p = 0.002 for 33% percentile-based model). Conclusions: Our data carries evidence for an association between the risk of disease progression after cART initiation and circulating pre-cART hs-CRP levels but not with levels of MT. These results suggest that pre-therapy HIV-driven pro-inflammatory milieu might overweight MT and its downstream immune-activation.

Type: Article
Title: Inflammation and microbial translocation measured prior to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and long-term probability of clinical progression in people living with HIV
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s12879-021-06260-y
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-021-06260-y
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10130394
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