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Care-experienced young people: What supportive relationships facilitate transition to and participation in post-16 Education, Employment or Training (EET)?

Mortune, Chinelo; (2021) Care-experienced young people: What supportive relationships facilitate transition to and participation in post-16 Education, Employment or Training (EET)? Doctoral thesis (D.Ed.Psy), UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

Post-16 transition is described by care-experienced young people as an incredibly challenging period, and their outcomes at this stage continue to remain a concern. This current study aimed to extend the literature by exploring the impact of multiple transitions and the relationships that young people experienced as most meaningful in helping to facilitate their transition to and participation in post-secondary EET activities; and how they attribute these relationships to their own outcomes. Professional partners’ views (from the LA and Voluntary sectors) on supporting young people at this stage was also sought to inform recommendations for practice. Risk and protective factors were examined through Transitions and Ecological Systems Theories. Seventeen participants were recruited: 12 young people from care backgrounds (aged 16-24) from three LAs, and 5 professional/adult participants from one LA and two London-based community/charity organisations. A qualitative multi-informant mixed-method design was employed. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data from all participants. Additionally, a demographic questionnaire and ecomap supplemented the data from the young people. The data was analysed thematically. The findings revealed factors at child and systems levels that increase risk of young people becoming NEET. Social, Emotional and Mental Health (SEMH) was identified as the most common need for many care-experienced young people during transition. Multiple gaps in support and resources were identified in various layers of the system. Foster carers and Mentoring and Befriending services were valued the most by young people in their attributions of improved outcomes. Educational Psychologists (EPs) appeared to be an untapped resource at this point of transition. The findings of this study have implications for policy makers and practitioners supporting young people in the role of corporate parent. This study put forward recommendations for practice and highlighted the need for EPs to support the transition pathway process as a core centrally funded activity.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: D.Ed.Psy
Title: Care-experienced young people: What supportive relationships facilitate transition to and participation in post-16 Education, Employment or Training (EET)?
Event: UCL (University College London)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2021. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Psychology and Human Development
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10130138
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