UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Fear of Campaign Violence and Support for Democracy and Autocracy

Von Borzyskowski, I; Daxecker, U; Kuhn, PM; (2021) Fear of Campaign Violence and Support for Democracy and Autocracy. Conflict Management and Peace Science (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of Von Borzyskowski_BDK_2021_ConsequencesEV.pdf]
Preview
Text
Von Borzyskowski_BDK_2021_ConsequencesEV.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (910kB) | Preview

Abstract

Election violence is common in many developing countries and has potentially detri- mental implications for democratic consolidation. Drawing on political psychology, we argue that citizens' fear of campaign violence undermines support for democracy while increasing support for autocracy. Using individual-level survey data from 21 electoral democracies in Sub-Saharan Africa, we find robust support for our argument. Citizens fearing campaign violence are less likely to support democracy and multi-party com- petition, more likely to favor a return to autocracy, and less likely to turn out to vote. Our findings have important implications for democratic survival and provide further impetus for reducing electoral violence.

Type: Article
Title: Fear of Campaign Violence and Support for Democracy and Autocracy
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/cmp
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Dept of Political Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10129809
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item