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Associations between combinations of job demands and job control among 6,16,818 people aged 55-64 in paid work with their labour market status 11 years later: a prospective cohort study.

Farrants, K; Head, J; Framke, E; Rugulies, R; Alexanderson, K; (2021) Associations between combinations of job demands and job control among 6,16,818 people aged 55-64 in paid work with their labour market status 11 years later: a prospective cohort study. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 10.1007/s00420-021-01717-8. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Given current discussions about extending working lives, more knowledge is needed on working conditions associated with labour market status in older age. OBJECTIVE: To explore associations between combinations of job demands and job control among workers aged 55-64 years and their labour market status 11 years later. METHODS: A population-based prospective cohort study using nationwide register data. The 616,818 individuals in Sweden aged 55-64 who in 2001 were in paid work were categorised using a job exposure matrix based on tertiles (reference = medium control/medium demands). Participants were followed up in 2012 regarding their main labour market status (paid work, old-age pension, no income/social assistance, sickness absence/disability pension, emigrated, dead; reference = old-age pension) using multinomial logistic regression for odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The fully adjusted analyses included adjustment for sociodemographic factors and unemployment or sickness absence/disability pension for more than half the year in 2001. RESULTS: Those in occupations with low job control at baseline were less likely to be in paid work at follow-up (OR low demands/low control 0.74, CI 0.71-0.78; high demands/low control 0.81, CI 0.75-0.87). Those in occupations with baseline high demands were less likely to have no income/social assistance at follow-up (OR high demands/low control 0.71, CI 0.52-0.96; high demands/high control 0.59, CI 0.47-0.75). CONCLUSION: Job demands and control when aged 55-64 were associated with labour market status 11 years later: high control was associated with greater chance of being in paid work, and high demands were associated with lower risk of no income/social assistance.

Type: Article
Title: Associations between combinations of job demands and job control among 6,16,818 people aged 55-64 in paid work with their labour market status 11 years later: a prospective cohort study.
Location: Germany
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00420-021-01717-8
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-021-01717-8
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Extending working lives, Job control, Job demands, Psychosocial working environment
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10129771
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