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Association of the transthyretin variant V122I with polyneuropathy among individuals of African ancestry

Parker, MM; Damrauer, SM; Tcheandjieu, C; Erbe, D; Aldinc, E; Hawkins, PN; Gillmore, JD; ... Nioi, P; + view all (2021) Association of the transthyretin variant V122I with polyneuropathy among individuals of African ancestry. Scientific Reports , 11 (1) , Article 11645. 10.1038/s41598-021-91113-6. Green open access

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Abstract

Hereditary transthyretin-mediated (hATTR) amyloidosis is an underdiagnosed, progressively debilitating disease caused by mutations in the transthyretin (TTR) gene. V122I, a common pathogenic TTR mutation, is found in 3-4% of individuals of African ancestry in the United States and has been associated with cardiomyopathy and heart failure. To better understand the phenotypic consequences of carrying V122I, we conducted a phenome-wide association study scanning 427 ICD diagnosis codes in UK Biobank participants of African ancestry (n = 6062). Significant associations were tested for replication in the Penn Medicine Biobank (n = 5737) and the Million Veteran Program (n = 82,382). V122I was significantly associated with polyneuropathy in the UK Biobank (odds ratio [OR] = 6.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.6-15.6, p = 4.2 × 10-5), which was replicated in the Penn Medicine Biobank (OR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.4, p = 6.0 × 10-3) and Million Veteran Program (OR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.2-1.8, p = 1.8 × 10-4). Polyneuropathy prevalence among V122I carriers was 2.1%, 9.0%, and 4.8% in the UK Biobank, Penn Medicine Biobank, and Million Veteran Program, respectively. The cumulative incidence of common hATTR amyloidosis manifestations (carpal tunnel syndrome, polyneuropathy, cardiomyopathy, heart failure) was significantly enriched in V122I carriers compared with non-carriers (HR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.7-4.5, p = 2.6 × 10-5) in the UK Biobank, with 37.4% of V122I carriers having at least one of these manifestations by age 75. Our findings show that V122I carriers are at increased risk of polyneuropathy. These results also emphasize the underdiagnosis of disease in V122I carriers with a significant proportion of subjects showing phenotypic changes consistent with hATTR amyloidosis. Greater understanding of the manifestations associated with V122I is critical for earlier diagnosis and treatment.

Type: Article
Title: Association of the transthyretin variant V122I with polyneuropathy among individuals of African ancestry
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-021-91113-6
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-91113-6
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Computational biology and bioinformatics, Diseases, Drug discovery, Genetics, Physiology, Signs and symptoms
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inflammation
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10129733
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