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High-altitude population neonatal and maternal phenotypes associated with birthweight protection.

Dolma, P; Angchuk, PT; Jain, V; Dadhwal, V; Kular, D; Williams, DJ; Montgomery, HE; (2021) High-altitude population neonatal and maternal phenotypes associated with birthweight protection. Pediatric Research 10.1038/s41390-021-01593-5. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: States which reduce foetal oxygen delivery are associated with impaired intrauterine growth. Hypoxia results when barometric pressure falls with ascent to altitude, and with it the partial pressure of inspired oxygen ('hypobaric hypoxia'). birthweight is reduced when native lowlanders gestate at such high altitude (HA)-an effect mitigated in native (millennia) HA populations. Studying HA populations offer a route to explore the mechanisms by which hypoxia impacts foetal growth. METHODS: Between February 2017 and January 2019, we prospectively studied 316 pregnant women, in Leh, Ladakh (altitude 3524 m, where oxygen partial pressure is reduced by 1/3) and 101 pregnant women living in Delhi (low altitude, 216 m above sea level). RESULTS: Of Ladakhi HA newborns, 14% were small for gestational age (<10th birthweight centile) vs 19% of newborn at low altitude. At HA, increased maternal body mass index, age, and uterine artery (UtA) diameter were positively associated with growth >10th weight centile. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that Ladakhi offspring birthweight is relatively spared from the expected adverse HA effects. Furthermore, maternal body composition and greater UtA size may be physiological HA adaptations and warrant further study, as they offer potential mechanisms to overcome hypoxia-related growth issues. IMPACT: Reduced foetal oxygen delivery seen in native lowlanders who gestate at HA causes foetal growth restriction-an effect thought to be mitigated in native HA populations. We found that greater maternal body mass and UtA diameter were associated with increased offspring birthweight in a (Ladakh) HA population. This supports a role for them as physiological mediators of adaptation and provides insights into potential mechanisms that may treat hypoxia-related growth issues.

Type: Article
Title: High-altitude population neonatal and maternal phenotypes associated with birthweight protection.
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41390-021-01593-5
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41390-021-01593-5
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Experimental and Translational Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL EGA Institute for Womens Health > Maternal and Fetal Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10129539
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