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Time-dependent lipid profile inversely associates with mortality in hemodialysis patients – independent of inflammation/malnutrition

Ebert, T; Qureshi, AR; Lamina, C; Fotheringham, J; Froissart, M; Eckardt, KU; Wheeler, DC; ... Stenvinkel, P; + view all (2021) Time-dependent lipid profile inversely associates with mortality in hemodialysis patients – independent of inflammation/malnutrition. Journal of Internal Medicine 10.1111/joim.13291. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Patients with end-stage kidney disease have an extremely high cardiovascular mortality rate, but there is a paradoxical relationship between lipid profile and survival in haemodialysis patients. To investigate whether inflammation/malnutrition confounds the associations between lipids and mortality, we studied a full lipid profile comprising of five clinically well-established lipid parameters and its associations with mortality in a large, multinational European cohort with a median follow-up >3 years. Methods: The association between quartiles of total, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), non-HDL, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, as well as triglyceride, levels and the end-points of all-cause, cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality was assessed in a cohort of 5,382 incident, adult haemodialysis patients from >250 Fresenius Medical Care dialysis centres out of 14 participating countries using baseline and time-dependent Cox models. Analyses were fully adjusted and stratified for inflammation/malnutrition status and other patient-level variables. Results: Time-dependent quartiles of total, HDL, non-HDL and LDL cholesterol were inversely associated with the hazard for all-cause, cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality. Compared with the lowest quartile of the respective lipid parameter, hazard ratios of other quartiles were <0.86. Similar, albeit weaker, associations were found with baseline lipid profile and mortality. Neither time-dependent nor baseline associations between lipid profile and mortality were affected by inflammation/malnutrition, statin use or geography. Conclusions: Baseline and time-dependent lipid profile are inversely associated with mortality in a large, multicentre cohort of incident haemodialysis patients. Inflammation/malnutrition is not a confounder nor effect modificator of the associations between lipid profile and mortality in European haemodialysis patients.

Type: Article
Title: Time-dependent lipid profile inversely associates with mortality in hemodialysis patients – independent of inflammation/malnutrition
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/joim.13291
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1111/joim.13291
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Renal Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10128648
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