UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Hybrid Governance and the Attribution of Political Responsibility: Experimental Evidence from the United States

Woodhouse, EF; Belardinelli, P; Bertelli, AM; (2021) Hybrid Governance and the Attribution of Political Responsibility: Experimental Evidence from the United States. Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory , Article muab014. 10.1093/jopart/muab014. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of muab014_final.pdf]
Preview
Text
muab014_final.pdf - Published Version

Download (247kB) | Preview

Abstract

How does the mode of public service delivery affect the attribution of responsibility for public goods? Through a survey experiment on a sample of more than 1,000 Americans, we provide evidence of how the allocation of public goods shapes voters’ support for incumbent politicians. We find that voters prefer a mixture of public–private financing and management when it comes to the delivery of infrastructure. However, once performance information is available, the mode of infrastructure delivery no longer influences their voting intention. The successful delivery of these infrastructure projects is what ultimately matters to voters. Moreover, this preference for a mixture of public and private involvement in public service delivery is stronger among citizens with high political knowledge, who are more likely to punish the incumbent for a failed first phase of the public service delivery. These findings deepen our understanding of how hybrid forms of public service delivery are perceived by voters and how performance information affects evaluations of the performance of public services and politicians alike. // In che misura le modalità di erogazione dei servizi pubblici influenzano l’attribuzione di responsabilità per la gestione dei beni pubblici? Tramite un esperimento su un campione di più di 1000 americani, dimostriamo come l’allocazione di beni pubblici condizioni il sostegno elettorale dei politici in carica da parte degli elettori. In merito al finanziamento e alla gestione dei servizi pubblici, risulta che gli elettori preferiscono un mix tra pubblico e privato. Tuttavia, non appena sono disponibili informazioni sulla performance, non sono più le modalità di erogazione del servizio a influenzare le intenzioni di voto degli elettori, bensì la riuscita dei progetti stessi. Inoltre, questa preferenza per un mix tra pubblico e privato nell’erogazione dei servizi pubblici è più marcata tra gli elettori con livelli più elevati di conoscenza politica, che si mostrano più propensi a punire il politico in carica nel caso di fallimento nella prima fase di erogazione del servizio pubblico. Questi risultati ci aiutano a capire meglio come certe forme ibride di erogazione dei servizi pubblici siano percepite dagli elettori e come le informazioni sulla performance influiscano sia la valutazione dei servizi pubblici che quella dei politici.

Type: Article
Title: Hybrid Governance and the Attribution of Political Responsibility: Experimental Evidence from the United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/jopart/muab014
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/jopart/muab014
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Public Management Research Association. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Dept of Political Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10128582
Downloads since deposit
11Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item