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Not ‘my economy’: A political ethnographic study of interest in the economy

Killick, A; (2021) Not ‘my economy’: A political ethnographic study of interest in the economy. British Journal of Politics and International Relations 10.1177/13691481211007064. Green open access

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Abstract

Some political economists explain the apparent downplaying of the importance of economic issues in political events such as Brexit with reference to the growing anger or despair people on low incomes feel about the economy. This ‘everyday political economy’ article draws on an ethnographic study conducted between 2016 and 2018 with residents of an English city to explore what people think about the phenomenon of the economy. It reveals significant differences in how interested high- and low-income participants are in the economy and its role as a bedrock for welfare. Low-income participants are more negative about the economy, particularly contesting politicians’ claims that it is distinct from the human sphere, when they view it as controlled by the rich. However, reasoning is based on post-2008 crisis economic conditions, and any lack of interest in the economy may be more calculative and temporary than is often assumed.

Type: Article
Title: Not ‘my economy’: A political ethnographic study of interest in the economy
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/13691481211007064
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1177/13691481211007064
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Brexit, depoliticisation, economic perceptions, economic self-interest, elite economic narratives, ethnography, everyday political economy, political behaviour, political disengagement, precariat, studying across, understanding of the economy
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10128516
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