UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Of Incentive, Bias, and Behaviour: An Empirical Economic Investigation into Project Delivery Constructs Influencing the Adoption of Building Information Modelling

Howard, Robert W.; (2021) Of Incentive, Bias, and Behaviour: An Empirical Economic Investigation into Project Delivery Constructs Influencing the Adoption of Building Information Modelling. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London). Green open access

[thumbnail of Howard_10128061_Thesis_sig-removed.pdf]
Preview
Text
Howard_10128061_Thesis_sig-removed.pdf

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

Building Information Modelling (BIM) is a collaborative construction platform allowing for digital databases, real-time change management, and a high degree of information reuse catalysing increased quality of work, enhanced productivity, and lower costs. Yet, overall adoption rates within industry remain vexingly low. Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) is currently the only contractual incentive vehicle available for BIM, and indeed the full potential of both are only realised when employed together; even so, uptake rates of IPD exist even lower. In response, this research evaluates hitherto ill-explored factors influencing the adoption of BIM by empirically testing hypotheses related to the impacts of three compounding theories upon the BIM decision calculus. Specifically, the incentive theory, the theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT), and the status quo bias model. The research approaches BIM adoption holistically at the organizational, individual, transactional, and behavioural levels through a mixed design combining five quantitative, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based studies and one interview-based pre-test/post-test case study with sample populations including a Fortune 100 contractor, internationally renowned trade groups, and arguably the most progressive municipal construction client in the world. Data was collected using purposive sampling and analysed quantitatively through Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) and qualitatively with Directed Content Analysis (DCA). Primary conclusions are that BIM decisions are hierarchical; BIM adoption involves a general higher-level decision-making requiring stakeholders’ consensus; BIM utilization involves a specific lower-level decision-making with managerial discretion; economic incentives and competitive pressure influence higher-level decisions; non-economic factors influence lower-level decisions but are moderated by organizations’ type and size; organizations’ size and the degree of managerial discretion are inversely related; strength of the effects vary across and within the three theory-based factors that influence BIM adoption; and the effects of leadership and organizational culture remain unaccounted for and require investigation.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: Of Incentive, Bias, and Behaviour: An Empirical Economic Investigation into Project Delivery Constructs Influencing the Adoption of Building Information Modelling
Event: UCL (University College London)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2021. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of the Built Environment
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10128061
Downloads since deposit
24Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item