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Sufi music therapy with makams as a potential intervention for common mental health disorders

Gurbuz-Dogan, Rumeysa Nur; (2021) Sufi music therapy with makams as a potential intervention for common mental health disorders. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London).

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Abstract

Sufi music has long been regarded as both spiritual and beneficial. This thesis aims to develop and evaluate Sufi music with makams as an intervention for people with mild to moderate levels of depression and anxiety. To reach this aim, the MRC framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions was used. As a first step, reviews of the historical and theoretical framework for Sufi music, its structure and applications were undertaken. Then an umbrella review of systematic reviews on receptive music therapy and its impact on mental health was conducted, followed by a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of listening to Sufi music with makams in patients with mental health symptoms. As a fourth step, a qualitative face-to-face interview study on how such music would best be delivered was conducted in adults attending two Turkish community centres in England. Participants listened to short clips of Sufi music and fed back on the emotions it evoked and how it might help them. A brief manual for the face-to-face delivery of Sufi music as an intervention for anxiety and depression was then designed from the results of these studies, as well as from consultation with three international experts on its application in clinical and community settings. Finally, a feasibility randomised trial was undertaken to explore the acceptability of the intervention, patients’ adherence to the intervention and the research, and to provide preliminary data on its effectiveness. The overall objective of the trial was to estimate whether a major trial would be possible. While the historical and theoretical framework provided a theoretical baseline for the intervention, the umbrella review and systematic review provided an evidence base. The qualitative study revealed that Sufi music with makams was perceived by listeners as spiritual and beneficial. Finally, the feasibility randomised controlled trial demonstrated that this music listening intervention was feasible and acceptable for Turkish people in the UK, and preliminary results of the clinical exploratory analysis revealed that it might be helpful for reducing anxiety and improving mental and spiritual well-being. Thus, the overall finding of this PhD project is that a manualised Sufi music intervention can be delivered to community dwelling people with mild to moderate distress, and that it is a feasible and acceptable intervention for the Turkish community living in the UK. It suggests that a larger randomised trial could be undertaken.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: Sufi music therapy with makams as a potential intervention for common mental health disorders
Event: UCL (University College London)
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2021. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10127369
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