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The effects of booster sessions on self-management interventions for chronic musculoskeletal pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

Buzasi, E; Kurakata, H; Gandhi, A; Birch, HL; Zarnegar, R; Best, L; (2021) The effects of booster sessions on self-management interventions for chronic musculoskeletal pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Pain 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000002302. (In press).

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Abstract

Our objective was to investigate the effectiveness of booster sessions after self-management interventions as a means of maintaining self-management behaviours in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and PsycINFO. Two authors independently identified eligible trials and collected data. We calculated the odds ratio (OR) for the analyses of dichotomous data, and standardised mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for continuous variables. Our search identified 14 studies with a total of 1695 patients. All studies were at high risk of bias and provided very low quality evidence. For the primary outcomes, booster sessions had no evidence of an effect on improving patient-reported outcomes on physical function (SMD-0.13, 95%CI -0.32 to -0.06; P=0.18), pain-related disability (SMD-0.16, 95%CI -0.36 to 0.03; P=0.11) and pain self-efficacy (SMD 0.15, 95%CI -0.07 to 0.36; P=0.18). For the secondary outcomes, booster sessions caused a significant reduction in patient-reported pain catastrophising (SMD-0.42, 95%CI -0.64 to -0.19; P=0.0004), and no evidence of an effect on patient-reported pain intensity, depression, coping or treatment adherence. There is currently little evidence that booster sessions are an effective way to prolong positive treatment effects or improve symptoms of long-term musculoskeletal conditions following self-management interventions. However, the studies were few with high heterogeneity, high risk of bias and overall low quality of evidence. Our review argues against including booster sessions routinely to self-management interventions for the purpose of behaviour maintenance.

Type: Article
Title: The effects of booster sessions on self-management interventions for chronic musculoskeletal pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials
Location: United States
DOI: 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000002302
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000002302
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Ortho and MSK Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10127245
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