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Quantifying Airway Dilatation in the Lungs from Computed Tomography

Quan, Kin; (2021) Quantifying Airway Dilatation in the Lungs from Computed Tomography. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

Non CF bronchiectasis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are pulmonary diseases characterised by the abnormal and permanent dilatation of the airways. Computed tomography (CT) is used in clinical practice to diagnose and monitor patients with the disease. Currently, analysis of the scans is performed by manual inspection and there is no established computerised method to quantify the enlargement of airways. I developed a pipeline to quantify the cross-sectional area for a given airway track. Using an airway segmentation, my proposed algorithm measures the area at contiguous intervals along the airway arclength from the Carina to the most distal point visible on CT. I showed the use of the data generated from the pipeline in two applications. First, I proposed a novel tapering measure as the gradient of a linear regression between a logarithmic area against the arclength. The measurement was applied to airways affected by bronchiectasis. Second, I used Bayesian Changepoint Detection (BCD) with the area measurements to locate the progression of IPF along the airway track. The proposed pipeline was applied to a set of clinically acquired scans. I show a statistical difference (p = 3.4×10−4 ) in the tapering measurement between bronchiectatic (n = 53) and controlled (n = 39) airways. In addition, I report a statistical difference (p = 7.2×10−3 ) in the change in measurement between airways remaining healthy (n = 14) and airways that have become bronchiectatic (n = 5). I show the tapering measurement is reproducible independent to voxel size, CT reconstruction, and radiation dose. Using BCD, I show on simulated data (n = 14) my proposed method can detect the progression of IPF within 2.5mm. Finally, using results from BCD, I present a novel measure of IPF progression as the percentage volume change in the diseased region of the airways.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: Quantifying Airway Dilatation in the Lungs from Computed Tomography
Event: UCL (University College London)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2021. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10127144
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