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Pharmacological and cell-specific genetic PI3Kα inhibition worsens cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction

Chen, X; Zhabyeyev, P; Azad, AK; Vanhaesebroeck, B; Grueter, CE; Murray, AG; Kassiri, Z; (2021) Pharmacological and cell-specific genetic PI3Kα inhibition worsens cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology , 157 pp. 17-30. 10.1016/j.yjmcc.2021.04.004. Green open access

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Vanhaesebroeck_Pharmacological and cell-specific genetic PI3Kα inhibition worsens cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction_AAM2.pdf - Accepted Version

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: PI3Kα (Phosphoinositide 3-kinase α) regulates multiple downstream signaling pathways controlling cell survival, growth, and proliferation and is an attractive therapeutic target in cancer and obesity. The clinically-approved PI3Kα inhibitor, BYL719, is in further clinical trials for cancer and overgrowth syndrome. However, the potential impact of PI3Kα inhibition on the heart and following myocardial infarction (MI) is unclear. We aim to determine whether PI3Kα inhibition affects cardiac physiology and post-MI remodeling and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. METHODS AND RESULTS: Wildtype (WT) 12-wk old male mice receiving BYL719 (daily, p.o.) for 10 days showed reduction in left ventricular longitudinal strain with normal ejection fraction, weight loss, mild cardiac atrophy, body composition alteration, and prolonged QTC interval. RNASeq analysis showed gene expression changes in multiple pathways including extracellular matrix remodeling and signaling complexes. After MI, both p110α and phospho-Akt protein levels were increased in human and mouse hearts. Pharmacological PI3Kα inhibition aggravated cardiac dysfunction and resulted in adverse post-MI remodeling, with increased apoptosis, elevated inflammation, suppressed hypertrophy, decreased coronary blood vessel density, and inhibited Akt/GSK3β/eNOS signaling. Selective genetic ablation of PI3Kα in endothelial cells was associated with worsened post-MI cardiac function and reduced coronary blood vessel density. In vitro, BYL719 suppressed Akt/eNOS activation, cell viability, proliferation, and angiogenic sprouting in coronary and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Cardiomyocyte-specific genetic PI3Kα ablation resulted in mild cardiac systolic dysfunction at baseline. After MI, cardiac function markedly deteriorated with increased mortality concordant with greater apoptosis and reduced hypertrophy. In isolated adult mouse cardiomyocytes, BYL719 decreased hypoxia-associated activation of Akt/GSK3β signaling and cell survival. CONCLUSIONS: PI3Kα is required for cell survival (endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes) hypertrophic response, and angiogenesis to maintain cardiac function after MI. Therefore, PI3Kα inhibition that is used as anti-cancer treatment, can be cardiotoxic, especially after MI.

Type: Article
Title: Pharmacological and cell-specific genetic PI3Kα inhibition worsens cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.yjmcc.2021.04.004
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yjmcc.2021.04.004
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher's terms and conditions.
Keywords: Angiogenesis, Myocardial infarction, Myocardial remodeling, PI3Kα, Signaling
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Oncology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10127067
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