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Polypharmacy difference between older people with and without diabetes: evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

Huang, Y-T; Steptoe, A; Wei, L; Zaninotto, P; (2021) Polypharmacy difference between older people with and without diabetes: evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice , Article 108842. 10.1016/j.diabres.2021.108842. (In press).

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Abstract

Aim: To study the association between diabetes and the prevalence of and risk factors for polypharmacy among adults aged 50 and older in England. / Methods: A cross-sectional study (2012−2013) of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Polypharmacy was defined as taking 5-9 long-term medications a day and heightened polypharmacy as 10 or more. Diabetes included diagnosed and undiagnosed cases (glycated haemoglobin ≥ 6.5% (48 mmol/mol)). / Results: Of 7729 participants, 1100 people had diabetes and showed higher prevalence rates of polypharmacy (41.1% vs 14.8%) and heightened polypharmacy (5.8% vs 1.7%) than those without diabetes, even when antihyperglycemic medications were excluded. Risk factors for polypharmacy also differed according to diabetes status. Among people with diabetes, risk factors for polypharmacy and heightened polypharmacy were having more long-term conditions (relative risk ratio (RRR) =1.86; 3.51) and being obese (RRR=1.68; 3.68), while females were less likely to show polypharmacy (RRR=0.51) and heightened polypharmacy (RRR=0.51) than males. Older age (RRR=1.04) was only related to polypharmacy among people without diabetes. / Conclusions: Adults with diabetes had higher prevalence rates of polypharmacy and heightened polypharmacy than those without diabetes, regardless of including antihyperglycemic drugs. Early detection of polypharmacy among older people with diabetes needs to focus on co-morbidities and obesity.

Type: Article
Title: Polypharmacy difference between older people with and without diabetes: evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing
DOI: 10.1016/j.diabres.2021.108842
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.diabres.2021.108842
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Ageing; diabetes; pharmacoepidemiology; polypharmacy; prevalence; risk factor
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy > Practice and Policy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10126989
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