UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Understanding persistent non-compliance in a remote, large-scale marine protected area

Collins, C; Nuno, A; Broderick, A; Curnick, D; de Vos, A; Franklin, T; Jacoby, D; ... Letessier, T; + view all (2021) Understanding persistent non-compliance in a remote, large-scale marine protected area. Frontiers in Marine Science , 8 , Article 650276. 10.3389/fmars.2021.650276. Green open access

[thumbnail of Curnick_fmars-08-650276.pdf]
Preview
Text
Curnick_fmars-08-650276.pdf - Published Version

Download (3MB) | Preview

Abstract

Area coverage of large-scale marine protected areas (MPAs) (LSMPAs, > 100,000 km2) is rapidly increasing globally. Their effectiveness largely depends on successful detection and management of non-compliance. However, for LSMPAs this can be difficult due to their large size, often remote locations and a lack of understanding of the social drivers of non-compliance. Taking a case-study approach, we review current knowledge of illegal fishing within the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT) LSMPA. Data stemming from enforcement reports (2010–20), and from fieldwork in fishing communities (2018–19) were combined to explore and characterise drivers of non-compliance. Enforcement data included vessel investigation reports (n = 188), transcripts of arrests (20) and catch seizures (58). Fieldwork data included fisher interviews (95) and focus groups (12), conducted in two communities in Sri Lanka previously associated with non-compliance in BIOT LSMPA. From 2010 to 2020, there were 126 vessels suspected of non-compliance, 76% of which were Sri Lankan. The majority of non-compliant vessels targeted sharks (97%), catching an estimated 14,340 individuals during the study period. Sri Lankan vessels were primarily registered to one district (77%) and 85% operated from just two ports within the fieldwork sites. Social Network Analysis (SNA) showed that 66% of non-compliant vessels were linked by social ties, including sharing crew members, compared with only 34% of compliant vessels. Thematic analysis of qualitative data suggested that perceptions of higher populations of sharks and social ties between vessels may both be important drivers. We discuss our findings within a global context to identify potential solutions for LSMPA management.

Type: Article
Title: Understanding persistent non-compliance in a remote, large-scale marine protected area
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2021.650276
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2021.650276
Language: English
Additional information: © 2021 Collins, Nuno, Broderick, Curnick, de Vos, Franklin, Jacoby, Mees, Moir-Clark, Pearce and Letessier. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Genetics, Evolution and Environment
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10126478
Downloads since deposit
31Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item